Zombie pigs and ethics

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearch

Abstract

[Extract] In a scientific article released last week, it was revealed that scientists had 'brought to life' the brain cells of recently slaughtered pigs. Their innovation was to restore circulation and cellular activity in the brain cells of severed pigs' heads, using an artificial circulatory system that pumped blood and drugs to the brain for six hours. The dead brain cells consequently showed signs of activity, although apparently no signs of consciousness: they are said to be 'cellularly active' but not 'a living brain'.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEureka Street
Volume29
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Ethics
Swine
Brain
Brain Death
Cardiovascular System
Consciousness
Head
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Cite this

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title = "Zombie pigs and ethics",
abstract = "[Extract] In a scientific article released last week, it was revealed that scientists had 'brought to life' the brain cells of recently slaughtered pigs. Their innovation was to restore circulation and cellular activity in the brain cells of severed pigs' heads, using an artificial circulatory system that pumped blood and drugs to the brain for six hours. The dead brain cells consequently showed signs of activity, although apparently no signs of consciousness: they are said to be 'cellularly active' but not 'a living brain'.",
author = "Kathrine Galloway",
year = "2019",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
journal = "Eureka Street",
issn = "1036-1758",
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Zombie pigs and ethics. / Galloway, Kathrine.

In: Eureka Street, Vol. 29, No. 8, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearch

TY - JOUR

T1 - Zombie pigs and ethics

AU - Galloway, Kathrine

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - [Extract] In a scientific article released last week, it was revealed that scientists had 'brought to life' the brain cells of recently slaughtered pigs. Their innovation was to restore circulation and cellular activity in the brain cells of severed pigs' heads, using an artificial circulatory system that pumped blood and drugs to the brain for six hours. The dead brain cells consequently showed signs of activity, although apparently no signs of consciousness: they are said to be 'cellularly active' but not 'a living brain'.

AB - [Extract] In a scientific article released last week, it was revealed that scientists had 'brought to life' the brain cells of recently slaughtered pigs. Their innovation was to restore circulation and cellular activity in the brain cells of severed pigs' heads, using an artificial circulatory system that pumped blood and drugs to the brain for six hours. The dead brain cells consequently showed signs of activity, although apparently no signs of consciousness: they are said to be 'cellularly active' but not 'a living brain'.

M3 - Comment/debate

VL - 29

JO - Eureka Street

JF - Eureka Street

SN - 1036-1758

IS - 8

ER -