Young people, economic crisis, social control and crime

Paul Wilson, RA Lincoln

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

[Extract] WHAT IS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN UNEMPLOYMENT AND CRIME?
in reviewing the characteristics of juvenile and adult offenders in Australia, Braithwaite noted that after race (in particular the rate of Aboriginal imprisonment), the second most striking characteristic of offending is unemployment. Roughly 20 per cent of those incarcerated in Australian prisons are employed at the time they are arrested and charged.
Similarly, at the ecological level of analysis there is consistent evidence that urban areas that have high levels of unemployment or concentrations of people with lower socio-economic status experience higher crime rates than do more affluent suburbs. Also, in a recent survey of crime in New South Wales, strong correlations between offender rates and characteristics of social regions - especially unemployment, proportion of single-parent families and the general level of poverty - were found.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)110-116
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Issues in Criminal Justice
Volume4
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

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social control
economic crisis
unemployment
offense
offender
single parent family
crime rate
imprisonment
suburb
correctional institution
urban area
poverty
evidence
economics
experience

Cite this

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abstract = "[Extract] WHAT IS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN UNEMPLOYMENT AND CRIME?in reviewing the characteristics of juvenile and adult offenders in Australia, Braithwaite noted that after race (in particular the rate of Aboriginal imprisonment), the second most striking characteristic of offending is unemployment. Roughly 20 per cent of those incarcerated in Australian prisons are employed at the time they are arrested and charged. Similarly, at the ecological level of analysis there is consistent evidence that urban areas that have high levels of unemployment or concentrations of people with lower socio-economic status experience higher crime rates than do more affluent suburbs. Also, in a recent survey of crime in New South Wales, strong correlations between offender rates and characteristics of social regions - especially unemployment, proportion of single-parent families and the general level of poverty - were found.",
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Young people, economic crisis, social control and crime. / Wilson, Paul; Lincoln, RA.

In: Current Issues in Criminal Justice, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1992, p. 110-116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Lincoln, RA

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AB - [Extract] WHAT IS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN UNEMPLOYMENT AND CRIME?in reviewing the characteristics of juvenile and adult offenders in Australia, Braithwaite noted that after race (in particular the rate of Aboriginal imprisonment), the second most striking characteristic of offending is unemployment. Roughly 20 per cent of those incarcerated in Australian prisons are employed at the time they are arrested and charged. Similarly, at the ecological level of analysis there is consistent evidence that urban areas that have high levels of unemployment or concentrations of people with lower socio-economic status experience higher crime rates than do more affluent suburbs. Also, in a recent survey of crime in New South Wales, strong correlations between offender rates and characteristics of social regions - especially unemployment, proportion of single-parent families and the general level of poverty - were found.

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