Working the Nexus: Teaching students to think, read and problem-solve like a lawyer

Kathrine Galloway, Mary Heath, Alex Steel, Anne Hewitt, Mark Israel, Natalie Skead

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Extract: The nature and purpose of Australian legal education has changed over time but it is at least arguable that one constant has been the importance of law students learning to think: more particularly, learning to think ‘like lawyers’. Despite agreement on thinking as a fundamental legal skill, giving content to this concept has generated debate within the academy and the profession. There is also some debate about why the many law students who will never be lawyers need to learn to think like lawyers. Further, even if there were agreement on what ‘thinking like a lawyer’ really means, how to teach legal thinking effectively remains relatively obscure.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-114
Number of pages119
JournalLegal Education Review
Volume26
Issue number1&2
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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