Which psychological resilience attributes are associated with lower aspects of anxiety in boys with an Autism Spectrum Disorder? Implications for guidance and counselling interventions

Vicki Bitsika, Christopher F. Sharpley

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    The effect of psychological resilience as a buffer against anxiety was investigated in a sample of 39 boys with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD) via individual online questionnaire responses to standardised inventories for assessing anxiety and psychological resilience. Ability to handle problems, make good decisions, think before acting and help others were the most powerful buffers against Generalised Anxiety Disorder, while thinking before acting significantly buffered social phobia. Believing that they were able to handle problems was significantly associated with less emotional anxiety about school, work or social activities, being irritable, unable to relax and fatigue. As well as describing the pathways between the components of psychological resilience and anxiety, these findings also suggest several specific directions for training programmes aimed at equipping boys with an ASD with skills to cope more effectively with anxiety.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)544-556
    Number of pages13
    JournalBritish Journal of Guidance and Counselling
    Volume42
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 5 Oct 2014

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    Psychological Resilience
    Counseling
    Anxiety
    Buffers
    Aptitude
    Anxiety Disorders
    Fatigue
    Autism Spectrum Disorder
    Education
    Equipment and Supplies

    Cite this

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    Which psychological resilience attributes are associated with lower aspects of anxiety in boys with an Autism Spectrum Disorder? Implications for guidance and counselling interventions. / Bitsika, Vicki; Sharpley, Christopher F.

    In: British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, Vol. 42, No. 5, 05.10.2014, p. 544-556.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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