What’s stopping you? The relationship between barriers, self-efficacy, and physical activity levels in incumbent deputy sheriffs

Maria M. Beitzel, Kathleen S. Wilson, Jay Dawes, Rob Marc Orr, Joe Dulla, Robert G. Lockie

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearch

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Abstract

Incumbent deputy sheriffs tend to be less physically active than recruits, despite the benefits of physical activity (PA) for health and job-related tasks (Orr et al., 2018). To address the barriers to PA in this population, self-efficacy may play a role as it is a key correlate of PA in many populations (Rhodes et al., 2017). However, to our knowledge, SE and specific barriers to PA have not been examined within deputy sheriffs. Therefore, this study explored barriers to PA as well as the role of SE on perceived barrier limitations and PA levels in deputy sheriffs. Sixty deputy sheriffs (Males: n=48, Females: n=12) from one law enforcement agency completed a cross-sectional survey. PA was assessed using the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (Godin & Shephard, 1985). Barriers to PA were measured using an open-ended questionnaire that asked about perceived barriers and how limiting those barriers were (Gyurcsik et al., 2009). A 6-item measure of SE was used to assess coping and scheduling SE (Rodgers & Sullivan, 2001). Multiple regressions were performed to predict PA (barrier limitation, coping and scheduling SE) and perceived barrier limitations (coping and scheduling SE). The three most common barriers identified were work hours (n=33, 55%), family commitments (n=32, 53.3%), and lack of time (n=27, 45%). Both the regression models were significant in predicting PA (R2=.21, p=.007) and perceived barrier limitations (R2=.21, p=.003). Scheduling SE was the only predictor of both PA (β=0.33, p=.013) and perceived barrier limitations (β= -0.04, p=.015). Similar to other populations, scheduling SE appears to be important for PA and reducing the perceived limiting nature of barriers among deputy sheriffs. The emergence of scheduling SE may be reflective of managing the most frequent barrier of work hours. Further research should address these barriers and how to improve scheduling SE in deputy sheriffs.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusUnpublished - 23 Oct 2019
Event34th Annual Association for Applied Sport Psychology Conference - Portland, United States
Duration: 23 Oct 201926 Oct 2019

Conference

Conference34th Annual Association for Applied Sport Psychology Conference
CountryUnited States
CityPortland
Period23/10/1926/10/19

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Self Efficacy
Population
Law Enforcement
Architectural Accessibility
Leisure Activities
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

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Beitzel, M. M., Wilson, K. S., Dawes, J., Orr, R. M., Dulla, J., & Lockie, R. G. (2019). What’s stopping you? The relationship between barriers, self-efficacy, and physical activity levels in incumbent deputy sheriffs. Abstract from 34th Annual Association for Applied Sport Psychology Conference, Portland, United States.
Beitzel, Maria M. ; Wilson, Kathleen S. ; Dawes, Jay ; Orr, Rob Marc ; Dulla, Joe ; Lockie, Robert G. / What’s stopping you? The relationship between barriers, self-efficacy, and physical activity levels in incumbent deputy sheriffs. Abstract from 34th Annual Association for Applied Sport Psychology Conference, Portland, United States.
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abstract = "Incumbent deputy sheriffs tend to be less physically active than recruits, despite the benefits of physical activity (PA) for health and job-related tasks (Orr et al., 2018). To address the barriers to PA in this population, self-efficacy may play a role as it is a key correlate of PA in many populations (Rhodes et al., 2017). However, to our knowledge, SE and specific barriers to PA have not been examined within deputy sheriffs. Therefore, this study explored barriers to PA as well as the role of SE on perceived barrier limitations and PA levels in deputy sheriffs. Sixty deputy sheriffs (Males: n=48, Females: n=12) from one law enforcement agency completed a cross-sectional survey. PA was assessed using the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (Godin & Shephard, 1985). Barriers to PA were measured using an open-ended questionnaire that asked about perceived barriers and how limiting those barriers were (Gyurcsik et al., 2009). A 6-item measure of SE was used to assess coping and scheduling SE (Rodgers & Sullivan, 2001). Multiple regressions were performed to predict PA (barrier limitation, coping and scheduling SE) and perceived barrier limitations (coping and scheduling SE). The three most common barriers identified were work hours (n=33, 55{\%}), family commitments (n=32, 53.3{\%}), and lack of time (n=27, 45{\%}). Both the regression models were significant in predicting PA (R2=.21, p=.007) and perceived barrier limitations (R2=.21, p=.003). Scheduling SE was the only predictor of both PA (β=0.33, p=.013) and perceived barrier limitations (β= -0.04, p=.015). Similar to other populations, scheduling SE appears to be important for PA and reducing the perceived limiting nature of barriers among deputy sheriffs. The emergence of scheduling SE may be reflective of managing the most frequent barrier of work hours. Further research should address these barriers and how to improve scheduling SE in deputy sheriffs.",
author = "Beitzel, {Maria M.} and Wilson, {Kathleen S.} and Jay Dawes and Orr, {Rob Marc} and Joe Dulla and Lockie, {Robert G.}",
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Beitzel, MM, Wilson, KS, Dawes, J, Orr, RM, Dulla, J & Lockie, RG 2019, 'What’s stopping you? The relationship between barriers, self-efficacy, and physical activity levels in incumbent deputy sheriffs' 34th Annual Association for Applied Sport Psychology Conference, Portland, United States, 23/10/19 - 26/10/19, .

What’s stopping you? The relationship between barriers, self-efficacy, and physical activity levels in incumbent deputy sheriffs. / Beitzel, Maria M.; Wilson, Kathleen S.; Dawes, Jay; Orr, Rob Marc; Dulla, Joe; Lockie, Robert G.

2019. Abstract from 34th Annual Association for Applied Sport Psychology Conference, Portland, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearch

TY - CONF

T1 - What’s stopping you? The relationship between barriers, self-efficacy, and physical activity levels in incumbent deputy sheriffs

AU - Beitzel, Maria M.

AU - Wilson, Kathleen S.

AU - Dawes, Jay

AU - Orr, Rob Marc

AU - Dulla, Joe

AU - Lockie, Robert G.

PY - 2019/10/23

Y1 - 2019/10/23

N2 - Incumbent deputy sheriffs tend to be less physically active than recruits, despite the benefits of physical activity (PA) for health and job-related tasks (Orr et al., 2018). To address the barriers to PA in this population, self-efficacy may play a role as it is a key correlate of PA in many populations (Rhodes et al., 2017). However, to our knowledge, SE and specific barriers to PA have not been examined within deputy sheriffs. Therefore, this study explored barriers to PA as well as the role of SE on perceived barrier limitations and PA levels in deputy sheriffs. Sixty deputy sheriffs (Males: n=48, Females: n=12) from one law enforcement agency completed a cross-sectional survey. PA was assessed using the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (Godin & Shephard, 1985). Barriers to PA were measured using an open-ended questionnaire that asked about perceived barriers and how limiting those barriers were (Gyurcsik et al., 2009). A 6-item measure of SE was used to assess coping and scheduling SE (Rodgers & Sullivan, 2001). Multiple regressions were performed to predict PA (barrier limitation, coping and scheduling SE) and perceived barrier limitations (coping and scheduling SE). The three most common barriers identified were work hours (n=33, 55%), family commitments (n=32, 53.3%), and lack of time (n=27, 45%). Both the regression models were significant in predicting PA (R2=.21, p=.007) and perceived barrier limitations (R2=.21, p=.003). Scheduling SE was the only predictor of both PA (β=0.33, p=.013) and perceived barrier limitations (β= -0.04, p=.015). Similar to other populations, scheduling SE appears to be important for PA and reducing the perceived limiting nature of barriers among deputy sheriffs. The emergence of scheduling SE may be reflective of managing the most frequent barrier of work hours. Further research should address these barriers and how to improve scheduling SE in deputy sheriffs.

AB - Incumbent deputy sheriffs tend to be less physically active than recruits, despite the benefits of physical activity (PA) for health and job-related tasks (Orr et al., 2018). To address the barriers to PA in this population, self-efficacy may play a role as it is a key correlate of PA in many populations (Rhodes et al., 2017). However, to our knowledge, SE and specific barriers to PA have not been examined within deputy sheriffs. Therefore, this study explored barriers to PA as well as the role of SE on perceived barrier limitations and PA levels in deputy sheriffs. Sixty deputy sheriffs (Males: n=48, Females: n=12) from one law enforcement agency completed a cross-sectional survey. PA was assessed using the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (Godin & Shephard, 1985). Barriers to PA were measured using an open-ended questionnaire that asked about perceived barriers and how limiting those barriers were (Gyurcsik et al., 2009). A 6-item measure of SE was used to assess coping and scheduling SE (Rodgers & Sullivan, 2001). Multiple regressions were performed to predict PA (barrier limitation, coping and scheduling SE) and perceived barrier limitations (coping and scheduling SE). The three most common barriers identified were work hours (n=33, 55%), family commitments (n=32, 53.3%), and lack of time (n=27, 45%). Both the regression models were significant in predicting PA (R2=.21, p=.007) and perceived barrier limitations (R2=.21, p=.003). Scheduling SE was the only predictor of both PA (β=0.33, p=.013) and perceived barrier limitations (β= -0.04, p=.015). Similar to other populations, scheduling SE appears to be important for PA and reducing the perceived limiting nature of barriers among deputy sheriffs. The emergence of scheduling SE may be reflective of managing the most frequent barrier of work hours. Further research should address these barriers and how to improve scheduling SE in deputy sheriffs.

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Beitzel MM, Wilson KS, Dawes J, Orr RM, Dulla J, Lockie RG. What’s stopping you? The relationship between barriers, self-efficacy, and physical activity levels in incumbent deputy sheriffs. 2019. Abstract from 34th Annual Association for Applied Sport Psychology Conference, Portland, United States.