What video games teach about conflict

Mary Power

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Currently, we face the problem of teaching children to be peacemakers in a world where popular video games available to children frequently model violent patterns of conflict resolution. Although video games can provide intense enjoyment for players, criticism of the long-term effects of exposure to models of violent reaction to conflict needs to be addressed and efforts made to provide alternative models which demonstrate that solving conflict involves learning how to see a situation from someone else's viewpoint, clear articulation of one's own position and the ability to perceive another's, together with the mental flexibility to imagine proposals that might meet the needs of everyone involved. This article analyses plot summaries and genres of current popular video games to discern those in which explicit violence towards others in conflict situations is modelled and those in which efforts are made to teach peaceful ways to solve conflict.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-248
Number of pages10
JournalAustralasian Dispute Resolution Journal
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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computer game
conflict situation
conflict resolution
genre
flexibility
criticism
violence
ability
Teaching
learning

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What video games teach about conflict. / Power, Mary.

In: Australasian Dispute Resolution Journal, 2008, p. 239-248.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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