What to bring when you are told not to bring a thing: The need for protocols in acknowledging Indigenous knowledges and participants in Australian research

Bindi Bennett*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article provides a content analysis of articles published in Australian Social Work, the British Journal of Social Work, the International Journal of Social Welfare and International Social Work from 2007 to 2017 regarding the practice of acknowledging Indigenous participants and knowledges in articles that contain Indigenous content. This article argues that acknowledgement is an important way of recognising and showing respect for Indigenous people, as active agents in the research process. Indigenous cultural ideas, values and principles are now contributing to and informing a significant amount of research. Ways are suggested by which authors and journals can develop good practice when acknowledging Indigenous peoples respectfully within their research. This research found a need for the development of specific journal editorial policies and guidelines for authors who wish to publish content pertaining to Indigenous peoples that adequately reflects their contribution while protecting and acknowledging Indigenous knowledge, ideas and ownership of information.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)167-183
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Sociology
Volume56
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2020
Externally publishedYes

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