Wet combing for the eradication of head lice

Paul Glasziou, John Bennett, Tammy Hoffman, HANDI Project Team

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearch

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Manual removal (using conditioner and comb or a wet comb) can be used in the treatment of head lice. Head lice infestation (Pediculosis humanus capitis) is a common problem. It is diagnosed by visualising the lice. As half of people infested with head lice will not scratch, all people in contact with a person affected with head lice should be manually checked for infestations. Wet combing is easily and safely performed at home, but persistence is needed. This article describes the process of head lice removal using a wet comb. It has NHMRC Level 2 evidence of efficacy and no serious adverse effects have been reported. This article forms part of a series on non-drug treatments, which summarise the indications, considerations and the evidence, and where clinicians and patients can find further information.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-130
Number of pages2
JournalAustralian Family Physician
Volume42
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

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Pediculus
Comb and Wattles
Lice Infestations
Phthiraptera
Therapeutics

Cite this

Glasziou, P., Bennett, J., Hoffman, T., & HANDI Project Team (2013). Wet combing for the eradication of head lice. Australian Family Physician, 42(3), 129-130.
Glasziou, Paul ; Bennett, John ; Hoffman, Tammy ; HANDI Project Team. / Wet combing for the eradication of head lice. In: Australian Family Physician. 2013 ; Vol. 42, No. 3. pp. 129-130.
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Glasziou, P, Bennett, J, Hoffman, T & HANDI Project Team 2013, 'Wet combing for the eradication of head lice' Australian Family Physician, vol. 42, no. 3, pp. 129-130.

Wet combing for the eradication of head lice. / Glasziou, Paul; Bennett, John; Hoffman, Tammy; HANDI Project Team.

In: Australian Family Physician, Vol. 42, No. 3, 03.2013, p. 129-130.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearch

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AU - Bennett, John

AU - Greenberg, Peter

AU - Green, Sally

AU - Gunn, Jane

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AU - Pirotta, Marie

AU - HANDI Project Team

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AB - Manual removal (using conditioner and comb or a wet comb) can be used in the treatment of head lice. Head lice infestation (Pediculosis humanus capitis) is a common problem. It is diagnosed by visualising the lice. As half of people infested with head lice will not scratch, all people in contact with a person affected with head lice should be manually checked for infestations. Wet combing is easily and safely performed at home, but persistence is needed. This article describes the process of head lice removal using a wet comb. It has NHMRC Level 2 evidence of efficacy and no serious adverse effects have been reported. This article forms part of a series on non-drug treatments, which summarise the indications, considerations and the evidence, and where clinicians and patients can find further information.

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