Visuo-vestibular contributions to vertical self-motion perception in healthy adults

I. Giannopulu, P. Leboucher, G. Rautureau, I. Israël, R. Jouvent

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The intensity of the visuo-vestibular interaction, i.e., visuo-vestibular conflict, would influence upward self-motion and downward self-motion latencies and cardiovascular activity. In order to test this hypothesis, thirty five healthy adults aged 22 years in average have been immersed to a central visual motion via a HMD. During upward and downward self-motion perception, the engagement of vestibular saccular organs seems to contribute differently to latencies and cardiovascular activation depending on the direction of gravitational acceleration. Downward self-motion latencies (same direction acceleration) are shorter than upward self-motion latencies (opposite direction acceleration). In the same vein, cardiovascular autonomic activation, reflecting by heart rate, is lower for downward self-motion than for upward self-motion. Our results provide evidence that visuo-vestibular interaction would contribute to influence both latencies and cardiovascular variation in vertical self-motion perception.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNew Trends in Medical and Service Robots - Human Centered Analysis, Control and Design
EditorsP Wenger, C Chevallereau, D Pisla, H Bleuler, A Rodic
PublisherKluwer Academic Publishers
Pages101-112
Number of pages12
Volume39
ISBN (Print)9783319306735
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes
Event4th International Workshop on Medical and Service Robotics, MESRob 2015 - Nantes, Nantes, France
Duration: 8 Jul 201510 Jul 2015
http://mesrob2015.irccyn.ec-nantes.fr/

Publication series

NameMechanisms and Machine Science
Volume39
ISSN (Print)22110984
ISSN (Electronic)22110992

Conference

Conference4th International Workshop on Medical and Service Robotics, MESRob 2015
CountryFrance
CityNantes
Period8/07/1510/07/15
Internet address

Fingerprint

Chemical activation
Helmet mounted displays

Cite this

Giannopulu, I., Leboucher, P., Rautureau, G., Israël, I., & Jouvent, R. (2016). Visuo-vestibular contributions to vertical self-motion perception in healthy adults. In P. Wenger, C. Chevallereau, D. Pisla, H. Bleuler, & A. Rodic (Eds.), New Trends in Medical and Service Robots - Human Centered Analysis, Control and Design (Vol. 39, pp. 101-112). (Mechanisms and Machine Science; Vol. 39). Kluwer Academic Publishers. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-30674-2_8
Giannopulu, I. ; Leboucher, P. ; Rautureau, G. ; Israël, I. ; Jouvent, R. / Visuo-vestibular contributions to vertical self-motion perception in healthy adults. New Trends in Medical and Service Robots - Human Centered Analysis, Control and Design. editor / P Wenger ; C Chevallereau ; D Pisla ; H Bleuler ; A Rodic. Vol. 39 Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2016. pp. 101-112 (Mechanisms and Machine Science).
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Giannopulu, I, Leboucher, P, Rautureau, G, Israël, I & Jouvent, R 2016, Visuo-vestibular contributions to vertical self-motion perception in healthy adults. in P Wenger, C Chevallereau, D Pisla, H Bleuler & A Rodic (eds), New Trends in Medical and Service Robots - Human Centered Analysis, Control and Design. vol. 39, Mechanisms and Machine Science, vol. 39, Kluwer Academic Publishers, pp. 101-112, 4th International Workshop on Medical and Service Robotics, MESRob 2015, Nantes, France, 8/07/15. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-30674-2_8

Visuo-vestibular contributions to vertical self-motion perception in healthy adults. / Giannopulu, I.; Leboucher, P.; Rautureau, G.; Israël, I.; Jouvent, R.

New Trends in Medical and Service Robots - Human Centered Analysis, Control and Design. ed. / P Wenger; C Chevallereau; D Pisla; H Bleuler; A Rodic. Vol. 39 Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2016. p. 101-112 (Mechanisms and Machine Science; Vol. 39).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

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Giannopulu I, Leboucher P, Rautureau G, Israël I, Jouvent R. Visuo-vestibular contributions to vertical self-motion perception in healthy adults. In Wenger P, Chevallereau C, Pisla D, Bleuler H, Rodic A, editors, New Trends in Medical and Service Robots - Human Centered Analysis, Control and Design. Vol. 39. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 2016. p. 101-112. (Mechanisms and Machine Science). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-30674-2_8