Views about sensory modulation from people with schizophrenia and treating staff: A multisite qualitative study

Tawanda Machingura*, Chris Lloyd, Karen Murphy, Sarah Goulder, David Shum, Heather Green

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Current non-pharmacological treatment options for people with schizophrenia are limited. There is, however, emerging evidence that sensory modulation can be beneficial for this population. This study aimed to gain insight into sensory modulation from the user’s and the treating staff’s perspective.

Method: A qualitative content analysis design was used. Transcripts from occupational therapists (n=11) and patients with schizophrenia (n=13) derived from in-depth semi-structured interviews were analysed for themes using content analysis.

Results: Five themes emerged from this study: Service user education on the sensory approach is the key; A variety of tools should be tried; Sensory modulation provides a valued treatment option; There are challenges of managing perceived risk at an organisational level; and There is a shortage of accessible and effective training.

Conclusion: People with schizophrenia and treating staff had congruent perceptions regarding the use of sensory modulation as a treatment option. The findings suggest that sensory modulation can be a valued addition to treatment options for people with schizophrenia. We suggest further research on sensory modulation intervention effectiveness using quantitative methods so these results can be further explored.

Keywords: Schizophrenia, qualitative research, mental health, patient participation, occupational therapists, sensory modulation, psychosocial interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages11
JournalBritish Journal of Occupational Therapy
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Feb 2021

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