Victorian police have ‘shoot to kill’ powers when cars are used as weapons: here’s why this matters

Research output: Contribution to journalOnline ResourceResearch

Abstract

This week, the Victorian police announced a “hostile vehicle” policy, which supports officers to shoot a driver to stop a vehicle deemed to be hostile and a danger to the public.

The policy comes into the force on the eve of a coronial inquest into the crimes of James Gargasoulas, who was convicted of six murders using his car in Bourke Street in Melbourne’s CBD in 2017. This policy doesn’t grant police new powers, but clarifies their responsibilities in facing a hostile driver.
Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Conversation
Publication statusPublished - 28 Oct 2019

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Cite this

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title = "Victorian police have ‘shoot to kill’ powers when cars are used as weapons: here’s why this matters",
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