Veterinary waste disposal: Practice and policy in Durban, South Africa (2001-2003)

M. McLean, H. K. Watson, A. Muswema

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In South Africa, until recently, veterinary waste has not been included in definitions of health care waste, and so has been neglected as a contributor to the hazardous waste stream. Despite the application of, for example, the "Polluter Pays" principle in South African environmental legislation, to generators of waste, which would include veterinarians, there appears to be little awareness of and even less enforcement of the legislation in this regard. This paper reports on a 2001-2003 survey of management practices of the five waste contractors servicing just over half of the veterinarians in Durban, South Africa's second largest city. Some of their activities, when evaluated in terms of the legislation, guidelines and policies relating to waste handling and disposal, were found to be non-compliant. Since any discussion on waste management should take cognisance of waste from generation to final disposal, the responsibility of veterinarians as waste generators is also discussed in the light of the recent developments in health care waste management in South Africa. This study presents a review of past and current policies, legislation and guidelines that have application to veterinary waste. This is the first study to address veterinary waste disposal in any South African city.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)902-911
Number of pages10
JournalWaste Management
Volume27
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 May 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Waste disposal
waste disposal
legislation
Waste management
health care
waste management
Health care
polluter pays principle
environmental legislation
Africa
policy
hazardous waste
management practice
Contractors

Cite this

McLean, M. ; Watson, H. K. ; Muswema, A. / Veterinary waste disposal : Practice and policy in Durban, South Africa (2001-2003). In: Waste Management. 2007 ; Vol. 27, No. 7. pp. 902-911.
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Veterinary waste disposal : Practice and policy in Durban, South Africa (2001-2003). / McLean, M.; Watson, H. K.; Muswema, A.

In: Waste Management, Vol. 27, No. 7, 03.05.2007, p. 902-911.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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