Validation of the COPD diagnostic questionnaire in an Australian general practice cohort: A cross-sectional study

Anthony J. Stanley, Iqbal Hasan, Alan J. Crockett, Onno C P van Schayck, Nicholas A. Zwar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The gold standard for the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is spirometry, but there are barriers to its use in primary care. Aims: To externally validate the COPD Diagnostic Questionnaire (CDQ) as a diagnostic tool in patients at increased risk in Australian general practice and to compare its performance with other CDQ validation studies. Methods: Patients were recruited from 36 general practices in Sydney, Australia. Former or current smokers aged 40-85 years with no prior COPD diagnosis were invited to a case-finding appointment with the practice nurse. The CDQ was collected and pre- and postbronchodilator spirometry was performed. Cases for whom complete CDQ data were present and the spirometry met quality standards were analysed. Results: Of 1,631 patients who attended case-finding recruitment, 1,054 (65%) could be analysed. Spirometry showed 13% had COPD. The ability of the CDQ to discriminate between patients with and without COPD was fair, represented by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.713. With a CDQ cut-off point value of 16.5 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 47% and, at a cut-off point value of 19.5, the sensitivity was 63% and specificity 70%. Conclusions: The CDQ did not discriminate between patients with and without COPD accurately enough to use as a diagnostic tool in patients at increased risk of COPD in Australian general practice. Further research is needed on the value of the CDQ as a tool for selecting patients for spirometry.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)92-97
Number of pages6
JournalPrimary Care Respiratory Journal
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

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General Practice
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Spirometry
Surveys and Questionnaires
Validation Studies
ROC Curve
Primary Health Care
Appointments and Schedules
Nurses

Cite this

Stanley, Anthony J. ; Hasan, Iqbal ; Crockett, Alan J. ; van Schayck, Onno C P ; Zwar, Nicholas A. / Validation of the COPD diagnostic questionnaire in an Australian general practice cohort : A cross-sectional study. In: Primary Care Respiratory Journal. 2014 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 92-97.
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Validation of the COPD diagnostic questionnaire in an Australian general practice cohort : A cross-sectional study. / Stanley, Anthony J.; Hasan, Iqbal; Crockett, Alan J.; van Schayck, Onno C P; Zwar, Nicholas A.

In: Primary Care Respiratory Journal, Vol. 23, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 92-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AB - Background: The gold standard for the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is spirometry, but there are barriers to its use in primary care. Aims: To externally validate the COPD Diagnostic Questionnaire (CDQ) as a diagnostic tool in patients at increased risk in Australian general practice and to compare its performance with other CDQ validation studies. Methods: Patients were recruited from 36 general practices in Sydney, Australia. Former or current smokers aged 40-85 years with no prior COPD diagnosis were invited to a case-finding appointment with the practice nurse. The CDQ was collected and pre- and postbronchodilator spirometry was performed. Cases for whom complete CDQ data were present and the spirometry met quality standards were analysed. Results: Of 1,631 patients who attended case-finding recruitment, 1,054 (65%) could be analysed. Spirometry showed 13% had COPD. The ability of the CDQ to discriminate between patients with and without COPD was fair, represented by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.713. With a CDQ cut-off point value of 16.5 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 47% and, at a cut-off point value of 19.5, the sensitivity was 63% and specificity 70%. Conclusions: The CDQ did not discriminate between patients with and without COPD accurately enough to use as a diagnostic tool in patients at increased risk of COPD in Australian general practice. Further research is needed on the value of the CDQ as a tool for selecting patients for spirometry.

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