Utility of incident and injury surveillance systems for incident and injury risk management in tactical populations

Rodney R Pope, Rob Marc Orr

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Abstract

Purpose: To explore differences between various Incident and Injury Surveillance Systems (IISS) in their designs and in the rates of injuries they report for army personnel, and to consider ways to optimise the utility of IISS to inform future efforts to control both cyclical and emergent incident and injury risks.

Methods: Rates of injury reported for Australian Army personnel based on the Army's Work Health and Safety incident reporting system and rates of injury reported for Australian Army personnel and for US Army personnel based on ‘point-of-care’ injury surveillance systems were extracted from results of prior research by the authors.1 Factors affecting the utility of IISS were also ascertained from previous research.

Results: Rates of injury reported for Australian Army personnel based on the Army's Work Health and Safety incident reporting system are substantially lower than rates of injury reported for Australian Army personnel and for US Army personnel based on ‘point-of-care’ injury surveillance systems.1 However, the latter do not allow for identification of ‘near misses’, dangerous exposures, hazards and similar incidents and factors that affect risk but do not result in immediate injury.1 The utility of IISS is affected by a range of factors, including1,2 data structure; data collection approaches; data completeness and integrity; context; organisational culture; communication between stakeholders; and analysis and reporting capabilities and timeliness.

Conclusions: The utility of IISS is heavily dependent on the system accessibility, analysis and reporting capabilities available in real time to commanders, and on tactical and risk management contexts. When tactical taskings and associated incident and injury risks are cyclical or repeated, well-designed IISS using hybrid data collection approaches will be of high utility for risk management. In tactical units engaged in new and emerging operational contexts, IISS are less useful to inform management of emerging and novel incident and injury risks, and IISS should be supplemented by other key approaches to incident and injury risk identification and assessment, thus bringing together population health and work health and safety approaches to incident and injury risk management.
Original languageEnglish
Article number172
Pages (from-to)s103
JournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Volume20
Issue numbers2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2017
Event4th International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance - Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre, Melbourne, Australia
Duration: 28 Nov 20171 Dec 2017
Conference number: 4th
https://www.jsams.org/issue/S1440-2440(17)X0004-2 (ICSPP Abstracts in the JSAMS (2017), Vol. 20, suppl. 2)

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Risk Management
Wounds and Injuries
Population
Military Personnel
Point-of-Care Systems
Health
Safety
Organizational Culture

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title = "Utility of incident and injury surveillance systems for incident and injury risk management in tactical populations",
abstract = "Purpose: To explore differences between various Incident and Injury Surveillance Systems (IISS) in their designs and in the rates of injuries they report for army personnel, and to consider ways to optimise the utility of IISS to inform future efforts to control both cyclical and emergent incident and injury risks.Methods: Rates of injury reported for Australian Army personnel based on the Army's Work Health and Safety incident reporting system and rates of injury reported for Australian Army personnel and for US Army personnel based on ‘point-of-care’ injury surveillance systems were extracted from results of prior research by the authors.1 Factors affecting the utility of IISS were also ascertained from previous research.Results: Rates of injury reported for Australian Army personnel based on the Army's Work Health and Safety incident reporting system are substantially lower than rates of injury reported for Australian Army personnel and for US Army personnel based on ‘point-of-care’ injury surveillance systems.1 However, the latter do not allow for identification of ‘near misses’, dangerous exposures, hazards and similar incidents and factors that affect risk but do not result in immediate injury.1 The utility of IISS is affected by a range of factors, including1,2 data structure; data collection approaches; data completeness and integrity; context; organisational culture; communication between stakeholders; and analysis and reporting capabilities and timeliness.Conclusions: The utility of IISS is heavily dependent on the system accessibility, analysis and reporting capabilities available in real time to commanders, and on tactical and risk management contexts. When tactical taskings and associated incident and injury risks are cyclical or repeated, well-designed IISS using hybrid data collection approaches will be of high utility for risk management. In tactical units engaged in new and emerging operational contexts, IISS are less useful to inform management of emerging and novel incident and injury risks, and IISS should be supplemented by other key approaches to incident and injury risk identification and assessment, thus bringing together population health and work health and safety approaches to incident and injury risk management.",
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Utility of incident and injury surveillance systems for incident and injury risk management in tactical populations. / Pope, Rodney R; Orr, Rob Marc.

In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Vol. 20, No. s2, 172, 11.2017, p. s103.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractResearchpeer-review

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AU - Pope, Rodney R

AU - Orr, Rob Marc

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N2 - Purpose: To explore differences between various Incident and Injury Surveillance Systems (IISS) in their designs and in the rates of injuries they report for army personnel, and to consider ways to optimise the utility of IISS to inform future efforts to control both cyclical and emergent incident and injury risks.Methods: Rates of injury reported for Australian Army personnel based on the Army's Work Health and Safety incident reporting system and rates of injury reported for Australian Army personnel and for US Army personnel based on ‘point-of-care’ injury surveillance systems were extracted from results of prior research by the authors.1 Factors affecting the utility of IISS were also ascertained from previous research.Results: Rates of injury reported for Australian Army personnel based on the Army's Work Health and Safety incident reporting system are substantially lower than rates of injury reported for Australian Army personnel and for US Army personnel based on ‘point-of-care’ injury surveillance systems.1 However, the latter do not allow for identification of ‘near misses’, dangerous exposures, hazards and similar incidents and factors that affect risk but do not result in immediate injury.1 The utility of IISS is affected by a range of factors, including1,2 data structure; data collection approaches; data completeness and integrity; context; organisational culture; communication between stakeholders; and analysis and reporting capabilities and timeliness.Conclusions: The utility of IISS is heavily dependent on the system accessibility, analysis and reporting capabilities available in real time to commanders, and on tactical and risk management contexts. When tactical taskings and associated incident and injury risks are cyclical or repeated, well-designed IISS using hybrid data collection approaches will be of high utility for risk management. In tactical units engaged in new and emerging operational contexts, IISS are less useful to inform management of emerging and novel incident and injury risks, and IISS should be supplemented by other key approaches to incident and injury risk identification and assessment, thus bringing together population health and work health and safety approaches to incident and injury risk management.

AB - Purpose: To explore differences between various Incident and Injury Surveillance Systems (IISS) in their designs and in the rates of injuries they report for army personnel, and to consider ways to optimise the utility of IISS to inform future efforts to control both cyclical and emergent incident and injury risks.Methods: Rates of injury reported for Australian Army personnel based on the Army's Work Health and Safety incident reporting system and rates of injury reported for Australian Army personnel and for US Army personnel based on ‘point-of-care’ injury surveillance systems were extracted from results of prior research by the authors.1 Factors affecting the utility of IISS were also ascertained from previous research.Results: Rates of injury reported for Australian Army personnel based on the Army's Work Health and Safety incident reporting system are substantially lower than rates of injury reported for Australian Army personnel and for US Army personnel based on ‘point-of-care’ injury surveillance systems.1 However, the latter do not allow for identification of ‘near misses’, dangerous exposures, hazards and similar incidents and factors that affect risk but do not result in immediate injury.1 The utility of IISS is affected by a range of factors, including1,2 data structure; data collection approaches; data completeness and integrity; context; organisational culture; communication between stakeholders; and analysis and reporting capabilities and timeliness.Conclusions: The utility of IISS is heavily dependent on the system accessibility, analysis and reporting capabilities available in real time to commanders, and on tactical and risk management contexts. When tactical taskings and associated incident and injury risks are cyclical or repeated, well-designed IISS using hybrid data collection approaches will be of high utility for risk management. In tactical units engaged in new and emerging operational contexts, IISS are less useful to inform management of emerging and novel incident and injury risks, and IISS should be supplemented by other key approaches to incident and injury risk identification and assessment, thus bringing together population health and work health and safety approaches to incident and injury risk management.

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DO - 10.1016/j.jsams.2017.09.401

M3 - Meeting Abstract

VL - 20

SP - s103

JO - Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

JF - Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

SN - 1440-2440

IS - s2

M1 - 172

ER -