Utilising one minute and four minute recovery when employing the resistance training contrast method does not negatively affect subsequent jump performance in the presence of concurrent training

Dean Ritchie*, Justin W. L. Keogh, Peter Reaburn, Jonathan D. Bartlett

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
38 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: 

Little is known about contrast training and post-activation performance enhancement (PAPE) in a same day concurrent training model. The aim of the current study was to examine the use of two short duration (1-min and 4-min) recovery periods on drop jump performance in same day concurrently trained athletes.

Methods: 

Ten professional Australian Rules footballers (age, 20.6 +/- 1.9 yr; height, 184.8 +/- 6.9 cm; body mass, 85.8 +/- 8.4 kg) completed two resistance training sessions with different PAPE recovery durations; 1-min and 4-min, 1 h following a field-based endurance session. Baseline (pre) drop jumps were compared to post-test maximal drop jumps, performed after each set of three squats (where each participant was encouraged to lift as heavy as they could), to determine changes between 1-min and 4-min recovery periods. Data were analysed by fitting a mixed model (significance was set at P

Results: 

There were no significant differences between baseline and experimental sets 1, 2 and 3 for reactive strength index (RSI), flight time, and total and relative impulse for either recovery duration. However, for contact time, 1-min baseline was significantly different from set 2 (mean difference; 95% CI [0.029; 0.000-0.057 s], P = 0.047, ES; 95% CI [-0.27; -1.20 to 0.66]). For RSI and flight time, 1-min was significantly higher than 4-min (RSI: 0.367; 0.091 to 0.642, P = 0.010, ES; 95% CI [0.52; -0.37 to 1.42]; flight time: 0.033; 0.003 to 0.063 s, P = 0.027, ES; 95% CI [0.86; -0.06 to 1.78]).

Discussion: 

Short recovery periods of 1-min may be a time-efficient form of prescribing strength-power exercise in contrast loading schemes. Longer recovery periods do not appear to benefit immediate, subsequent performance.

Original languageEnglish
Article number10031
Number of pages19
JournalPEERJ
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Oct 2020

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