Using telepresence for social connection: Views of older people with dementia, families, and health professionals from a mixed methods pilot study

Wendy Moyle, Cindy Jones, Toni Dwan, Tamara Ownsworth, Billy Sung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To explore the acceptability of telepresence robots in dementia care from the perspectives of people with dementia, family carers, and health professionals/trainees, and investigate the utility of a social presence assessment tool, the Modified-Temple Presence Inventory (Modified-TPI), for people with dementia.

METHOD: A mixed-methods pilot study conducted in a social robotics laboratory. Three participant groups (n = 22) - dyads of people with dementia and their carers (n = 5 respectively), and health professionals/trainees (n = 12) - participated in individual one-off intervention sessions with the telepresence robot, Giraff, with follow-up interviews. Sessions covered how to use Giraff, followed by interactive practice in making a video-call involving conversation and manoeuvring of Giraff. Participants with dementia experienced receiving a call made by their carer; healthcare professionals/trainees experienced making and receiving a call. Outcomes of interest were sense of presence [Modified-TPI], affective response (International Positive and Negative Affect Schedule [I-PANAS-S]; Observable Displays of Affect Scale [ODAS]), and attitudes and reactions to Giraff (semi-structured interviews).

RESULTS: Participants reported a sense of authenticity and social connection through the experience. They indicated positive social presence through Giraff, and significantly higher positive (mean score 18.77; ±4.00) than negative affect (mean score 8.05; ±1.76) on the I-PANAS-SF, and on the facial display subscale of the ODAS (positive - mean score 15.50; ±3.51 versus negative - mean score 4.00; ±0.00).

CONCLUSION: Telepresence has potential use in situations where people with dementia require social connection. Studies with larger sample sizes, varied characteristics, and cost-effectiveness analysis are needed to inform the application of telepresence in healthcare practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalAging and Mental Health
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 17 Nov 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Family Health
Dementia
Caregivers
Interviews
Delivery of Health Care
Equipment and Supplies
Robotics
Sample Size
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Appointments and Schedules
Health

Cite this

@article{90c7ecc458a343eca014af7d107ce448,
title = "Using telepresence for social connection: Views of older people with dementia, families, and health professionals from a mixed methods pilot study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To explore the acceptability of telepresence robots in dementia care from the perspectives of people with dementia, family carers, and health professionals/trainees, and investigate the utility of a social presence assessment tool, the Modified-Temple Presence Inventory (Modified-TPI), for people with dementia.METHOD: A mixed-methods pilot study conducted in a social robotics laboratory. Three participant groups (n = 22) - dyads of people with dementia and their carers (n = 5 respectively), and health professionals/trainees (n = 12) - participated in individual one-off intervention sessions with the telepresence robot, Giraff, with follow-up interviews. Sessions covered how to use Giraff, followed by interactive practice in making a video-call involving conversation and manoeuvring of Giraff. Participants with dementia experienced receiving a call made by their carer; healthcare professionals/trainees experienced making and receiving a call. Outcomes of interest were sense of presence [Modified-TPI], affective response (International Positive and Negative Affect Schedule [I-PANAS-S]; Observable Displays of Affect Scale [ODAS]), and attitudes and reactions to Giraff (semi-structured interviews).RESULTS: Participants reported a sense of authenticity and social connection through the experience. They indicated positive social presence through Giraff, and significantly higher positive (mean score 18.77; ±4.00) than negative affect (mean score 8.05; ±1.76) on the I-PANAS-SF, and on the facial display subscale of the ODAS (positive - mean score 15.50; ±3.51 versus negative - mean score 4.00; ±0.00).CONCLUSION: Telepresence has potential use in situations where people with dementia require social connection. Studies with larger sample sizes, varied characteristics, and cost-effectiveness analysis are needed to inform the application of telepresence in healthcare practice.",
author = "Wendy Moyle and Cindy Jones and Toni Dwan and Tamara Ownsworth and Billy Sung",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "17",
doi = "10.1080/13607863.2018.1509297",
language = "English",
pages = "1--8",
journal = "Aging and Mental Health",
issn = "1360-7863",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",

}

Using telepresence for social connection : Views of older people with dementia, families, and health professionals from a mixed methods pilot study. / Moyle, Wendy; Jones, Cindy; Dwan, Toni; Ownsworth, Tamara; Sung, Billy.

In: Aging and Mental Health, 17.11.2018, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using telepresence for social connection

T2 - Views of older people with dementia, families, and health professionals from a mixed methods pilot study

AU - Moyle, Wendy

AU - Jones, Cindy

AU - Dwan, Toni

AU - Ownsworth, Tamara

AU - Sung, Billy

PY - 2018/11/17

Y1 - 2018/11/17

N2 - OBJECTIVES: To explore the acceptability of telepresence robots in dementia care from the perspectives of people with dementia, family carers, and health professionals/trainees, and investigate the utility of a social presence assessment tool, the Modified-Temple Presence Inventory (Modified-TPI), for people with dementia.METHOD: A mixed-methods pilot study conducted in a social robotics laboratory. Three participant groups (n = 22) - dyads of people with dementia and their carers (n = 5 respectively), and health professionals/trainees (n = 12) - participated in individual one-off intervention sessions with the telepresence robot, Giraff, with follow-up interviews. Sessions covered how to use Giraff, followed by interactive practice in making a video-call involving conversation and manoeuvring of Giraff. Participants with dementia experienced receiving a call made by their carer; healthcare professionals/trainees experienced making and receiving a call. Outcomes of interest were sense of presence [Modified-TPI], affective response (International Positive and Negative Affect Schedule [I-PANAS-S]; Observable Displays of Affect Scale [ODAS]), and attitudes and reactions to Giraff (semi-structured interviews).RESULTS: Participants reported a sense of authenticity and social connection through the experience. They indicated positive social presence through Giraff, and significantly higher positive (mean score 18.77; ±4.00) than negative affect (mean score 8.05; ±1.76) on the I-PANAS-SF, and on the facial display subscale of the ODAS (positive - mean score 15.50; ±3.51 versus negative - mean score 4.00; ±0.00).CONCLUSION: Telepresence has potential use in situations where people with dementia require social connection. Studies with larger sample sizes, varied characteristics, and cost-effectiveness analysis are needed to inform the application of telepresence in healthcare practice.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To explore the acceptability of telepresence robots in dementia care from the perspectives of people with dementia, family carers, and health professionals/trainees, and investigate the utility of a social presence assessment tool, the Modified-Temple Presence Inventory (Modified-TPI), for people with dementia.METHOD: A mixed-methods pilot study conducted in a social robotics laboratory. Three participant groups (n = 22) - dyads of people with dementia and their carers (n = 5 respectively), and health professionals/trainees (n = 12) - participated in individual one-off intervention sessions with the telepresence robot, Giraff, with follow-up interviews. Sessions covered how to use Giraff, followed by interactive practice in making a video-call involving conversation and manoeuvring of Giraff. Participants with dementia experienced receiving a call made by their carer; healthcare professionals/trainees experienced making and receiving a call. Outcomes of interest were sense of presence [Modified-TPI], affective response (International Positive and Negative Affect Schedule [I-PANAS-S]; Observable Displays of Affect Scale [ODAS]), and attitudes and reactions to Giraff (semi-structured interviews).RESULTS: Participants reported a sense of authenticity and social connection through the experience. They indicated positive social presence through Giraff, and significantly higher positive (mean score 18.77; ±4.00) than negative affect (mean score 8.05; ±1.76) on the I-PANAS-SF, and on the facial display subscale of the ODAS (positive - mean score 15.50; ±3.51 versus negative - mean score 4.00; ±0.00).CONCLUSION: Telepresence has potential use in situations where people with dementia require social connection. Studies with larger sample sizes, varied characteristics, and cost-effectiveness analysis are needed to inform the application of telepresence in healthcare practice.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85057543743&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/13607863.2018.1509297

DO - 10.1080/13607863.2018.1509297

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 8

JO - Aging and Mental Health

JF - Aging and Mental Health

SN - 1360-7863

ER -