Using SurveyMonkey® to teach safe social media strategies to medical students in their clinical years

Katrina A. Bramstedt, Ben N. Ierna, Victoria K. Woodcroft-Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Social media is a valuable tool in the practice of medicine, but it can also be an area of 'treacherous waters' for medical students. Those in their upper years of study are off-site and scattered broadly, undertaking clinical rotations; thus, in-house (university lecture) sessions are impractical. Nonetheless, during these clinical years students are generally high users of social media technology, putting them at risk of harm if they lack appropriate ethical awareness. We created a compulsory session in social media ethics (Doctoring and Social Media) offered in two online modes (narrated PowerPoint file or YouTube video) to fourth- And fifth-year undergraduate medical students. The novelty of our work was the use of SurveyMonkey® to deliver the file links, as well as to take attendance and deliver a post-session performance assessment. All 167 students completed the course and provided feedback. Overall, 73% Agreed or Strongly Agreed the course session would aid their professionalism skills and behaviours, and 95% supported delivery of the curriculum online. The most frequent areas of learning occurred in the following topics: Email correspondence with patients, medical photography, and awareness of medical apps. SurveyMonkey® is a valuable and efficient tool for curriculum delivery, attendance taking, and assessment activities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-124
Number of pages8
JournalCommunication and Medicine
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Social Media
Medical Students
Curriculum
Students
Photography
Ethics
Medicine
Learning
Technology
Water

Cite this

Bramstedt, Katrina A. ; Ierna, Ben N. ; Woodcroft-Brown, Victoria K. / Using SurveyMonkey® to teach safe social media strategies to medical students in their clinical years. In: Communication and Medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 11, No. 2. pp. 117-124.
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Using SurveyMonkey® to teach safe social media strategies to medical students in their clinical years. / Bramstedt, Katrina A.; Ierna, Ben N.; Woodcroft-Brown, Victoria K.

In: Communication and Medicine, Vol. 11, No. 2, 2014, p. 117-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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