Unsettled Great South Land? 'Um' indeed

Research output: Contribution to journalOnline ResourceProfessional

Abstract

[Extract]
The Prime Minister, Tony Abbott, in a speech concerning foreign investment is reported as having said


I guess our country owes its existence to a form of foreign investment by the British government in the then unsettled or, um, scarcely settled, Great South Land.
Similarly, this week New Matilda reported on Rolf Harris' racism, noting his 2008 comments that

The attitude is that in their [ie Aboriginal peoples'] original way of life they would really wreck the surrounding countryside that they lived in and they would leave all the garbage and they would go walkabout to the next place.
Without addressing the implications of the Prime Minister's equating English acquisition of Australian territory with the benign sounding 'foreign investment', the allegation of a 'scarcely settled' land deserves correction. Like Rolf Harris' statement, it represents a misunderstanding of the nature of connection, occupation and use of land by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. While I cannot speak for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, I believe that I can point out the obvious mistake in these outdated notions.
Original languageEnglish
JournalCurl: Property law, women and law, contemporary legal issues
Publication statusPublished - 4 Jul 2017
Externally publishedYes

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foreign investment
minister
way of life
racism
occupation

Cite this

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title = "Unsettled Great South Land? 'Um' indeed",
abstract = "[Extract]The Prime Minister, Tony Abbott, in a speech concerning foreign investment is reported as having said I guess our country owes its existence to a form of foreign investment by the British government in the then unsettled or, um, scarcely settled, Great South Land.Similarly, this week New Matilda reported on Rolf Harris' racism, noting his 2008 comments thatThe attitude is that in their [ie Aboriginal peoples'] original way of life they would really wreck the surrounding countryside that they lived in and they would leave all the garbage and they would go walkabout to the next place.Without addressing the implications of the Prime Minister's equating English acquisition of Australian territory with the benign sounding 'foreign investment', the allegation of a 'scarcely settled' land deserves correction. Like Rolf Harris' statement, it represents a misunderstanding of the nature of connection, occupation and use of land by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. While I cannot speak for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, I believe that I can point out the obvious mistake in these outdated notions.",
author = "Kathrine Galloway",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
day = "4",
language = "English",
journal = "Curl: Property law, women and law, contemporary legal issues",

}

Unsettled Great South Land? 'Um' indeed. / Galloway, Kathrine.

In: Curl: Property law, women and law, contemporary legal issues, 04.07.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalOnline ResourceProfessional

TY - JOUR

T1 - Unsettled Great South Land? 'Um' indeed

AU - Galloway, Kathrine

PY - 2017/7/4

Y1 - 2017/7/4

N2 - [Extract]The Prime Minister, Tony Abbott, in a speech concerning foreign investment is reported as having said I guess our country owes its existence to a form of foreign investment by the British government in the then unsettled or, um, scarcely settled, Great South Land.Similarly, this week New Matilda reported on Rolf Harris' racism, noting his 2008 comments thatThe attitude is that in their [ie Aboriginal peoples'] original way of life they would really wreck the surrounding countryside that they lived in and they would leave all the garbage and they would go walkabout to the next place.Without addressing the implications of the Prime Minister's equating English acquisition of Australian territory with the benign sounding 'foreign investment', the allegation of a 'scarcely settled' land deserves correction. Like Rolf Harris' statement, it represents a misunderstanding of the nature of connection, occupation and use of land by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. While I cannot speak for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, I believe that I can point out the obvious mistake in these outdated notions.

AB - [Extract]The Prime Minister, Tony Abbott, in a speech concerning foreign investment is reported as having said I guess our country owes its existence to a form of foreign investment by the British government in the then unsettled or, um, scarcely settled, Great South Land.Similarly, this week New Matilda reported on Rolf Harris' racism, noting his 2008 comments thatThe attitude is that in their [ie Aboriginal peoples'] original way of life they would really wreck the surrounding countryside that they lived in and they would leave all the garbage and they would go walkabout to the next place.Without addressing the implications of the Prime Minister's equating English acquisition of Australian territory with the benign sounding 'foreign investment', the allegation of a 'scarcely settled' land deserves correction. Like Rolf Harris' statement, it represents a misunderstanding of the nature of connection, occupation and use of land by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. While I cannot speak for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, I believe that I can point out the obvious mistake in these outdated notions.

M3 - Online Resource

JO - Curl: Property law, women and law, contemporary legal issues

JF - Curl: Property law, women and law, contemporary legal issues

ER -