Understanding the prevalence and determinants of childhood undernutrition among infants and young children (six months to five years) in Sub-Saharan African countries: A protocol for a Scoping Review.

Francis Riwa, Kate Odgers-Jewell, Mark A. Jones, Andrew Mushi

Research output: Other contributionResearch

Abstract

Undernutrition can result from the insufficient intake of energy and nutrients to meet an individual’s needs to maintain good health. Undernutrition can increase the risk of infectious diseases, diet-related non-communicable diseases, premature death, and impaired brain development. Additionally, undernutrition can reduce productivity and increase the high burden of healthcare costs. Undernutrition includes stunting, wasting, underweight, and micronutrient deficiencies or insufficiencies.

Despite the substantial progress witnessed over the last 20 years, undernutrition has remained an alarming global challenge, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Globally, stunting has declined, while wasting still devastates the lives of many children worldwide. Sub-Saharan Africa is the only region where the prevalence of stunting in children under five years of age has significantly increased.
This research project aims to understand the prevalence and determinants of childhood undernutrition among infants and young children aged six months to five years in Sub-Saharan African countries.
Original languageEnglish
TypeResearch protocol
PublisherOpen Science Framework Registries
Publication statusPublished - 23 Dec 2022

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