Understanding cultural influences on back pain and back pain research

Nicholas Henschke, Eva Lorenz, Roman Pokora, Zoe A. Michaleff, Jonathan N.A. Quartey, Vinicius Cunha Oliveira

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Low back pain is highly prevalent and places a considerable burden on individuals, their families and communities. This back pain burden is unequally distributed around the world and within populations. Clinicians and researchers addressing back pain should be aware of the cultural, social and political context of back pain patients and how this context can influence pain perception, disability and health care use. Culture, which influences the beliefs and behaviour of individuals within a social group, could be considered an important contributor to the unequal distribution of back pain. However, there is paucity of high-quality research exploring the influence of culture on the experience and management of back pain. Further development and testing of specific tools, assessment methods and communication strategies are needed to improve our understanding of how cultural practices, values and identifications affect those dealing with back pain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1037-1049
Number of pages13
JournalBest Practice and Research: Clinical Rheumatology
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Back Pain
Research
Pain Perception
Low Back Pain
Communication
Research Personnel
Delivery of Health Care
Population

Cite this

Henschke, Nicholas ; Lorenz, Eva ; Pokora, Roman ; Michaleff, Zoe A. ; Quartey, Jonathan N.A. ; Oliveira, Vinicius Cunha. / Understanding cultural influences on back pain and back pain research. In: Best Practice and Research: Clinical Rheumatology. 2016 ; Vol. 30, No. 6. pp. 1037-1049.
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Understanding cultural influences on back pain and back pain research. / Henschke, Nicholas; Lorenz, Eva; Pokora, Roman; Michaleff, Zoe A.; Quartey, Jonathan N.A.; Oliveira, Vinicius Cunha.

In: Best Practice and Research: Clinical Rheumatology, Vol. 30, No. 6, 01.12.2016, p. 1037-1049.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

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