Transplant associated infections—The role of the gastrointestinal microbiota and potential therapeutic options

Samuel Chan*, Carmel M. Hawley, Katrina L. Campbell, Mark Morrison, Scott B. Campbell, Nicole M. Isbel, Ross S. Francis, Elliot G. Playford, David W. Johnson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infectious complications are common following kidney transplantation and rank in the top five causes of death in patients with allograft function. Over the last 5 years, there has been emerging evidence that changes in the gastrointestinal microbiota following kidney transplantation may play a key role in the pathogenesis of transplant-associated infections. Different factors have emerged which may disrupt the interaction between the gastrointestinal microbiota and the immune system, which may lead to infective complications in kidney transplant recipients. Over the last 5 years, there has been emerging evidence that changes in the gastrointestinal microbiota following kidney transplantation may play a key role in the pathogenesis of transplant-associated infections. This review will discuss the structure and function of the gastrointestinal microbiota, the changes that occur in the gastrointestinal microbiota following kidney transplantation and the factors underpinning these changes, how these changes may lead to transplant-associated infectious complications and potential treatments which may be instituted to mitigate this risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-13
Number of pages9
JournalNephrology
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2020
Externally publishedYes

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