Transition Towards Green Facility Management: Bridging the Knowledge Gaps of Facilities Managers

Yujie Lu, Ruidong Chang, Dan Chong, Min Li Joyce Ngiam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The building industry has experienced a widespread transition towards green buildings
and consequently a growing need for green facilities professionals to maximize green
building potential in terms of energy efficiency, water conservation and waste reduction
in their operational stage. Green buildings have unique technological systems
that require facility managers to have relevant knowledge and skills to conduct proper
facilities management and maintenance planning to maximize the potential of green
buildings. It is important, then, to investigate whether knowledge gaps for facility
managers exist with respect to green buildings, and if so, how these knowledge
gaps could be bridged. Though several studies have investigated the operation and
maintenance processes of green buildings, few studies considered facility managers’
knowledge and skills regarding green facility management (GFM). Set in the context
of Singapore, this study aims to holistically investigate the knowledge and skills of
managing green buildings in the community of facility managers, including their perceived
differences between green and conventional buildings, the difficulty of GFM,
the knowledge gaps of GFM and the underlying reasons, as well as how the gaps could
be bridged. A total of 90 survey responses were collected and eight interviews with key
stakeholders were conducted, which indicate facility managers believe green buildings
do have special features that require unique knowledge and skills, and currently
knowledge gaps do exist hindering the transition towards GFM. Therefore, this paper
derives plausible solutions to bridge the knowledge gaps, such as establishing holistic
subsidies for those facility managers participating in training programs of GFM. This
study provides references for researchers and relevant governmental departments to
better understand industry professionals’ knowledge gaps in the transitioning process
towards a green built environment, and to make better policy decisions bridging the
knowledge gaps and thereby facilitating the green transition process.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)122-144
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Green Building
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2018

Fingerprint

Construction Industry
Knowledge Management
knowledge gap
Singapore
Industry
Managers
Maintenance
Research Personnel
Interviews
manager
Education
Water
management
building
energy efficiency
Surveys and Questionnaires
Water conservation
green building
industry
Energy efficiency

Cite this

@article{65e41fbfa6ac4d999d7ad5bcf0d08f75,
title = "Transition Towards Green Facility Management: Bridging the Knowledge Gaps of Facilities Managers",
abstract = "The building industry has experienced a widespread transition towards green buildingsand consequently a growing need for green facilities professionals to maximize greenbuilding potential in terms of energy efficiency, water conservation and waste reductionin their operational stage. Green buildings have unique technological systemsthat require facility managers to have relevant knowledge and skills to conduct properfacilities management and maintenance planning to maximize the potential of greenbuildings. It is important, then, to investigate whether knowledge gaps for facilitymanagers exist with respect to green buildings, and if so, how these knowledgegaps could be bridged. Though several studies have investigated the operation andmaintenance processes of green buildings, few studies considered facility managers’knowledge and skills regarding green facility management (GFM). Set in the contextof Singapore, this study aims to holistically investigate the knowledge and skills ofmanaging green buildings in the community of facility managers, including their perceiveddifferences between green and conventional buildings, the difficulty of GFM,the knowledge gaps of GFM and the underlying reasons, as well as how the gaps couldbe bridged. A total of 90 survey responses were collected and eight interviews with keystakeholders were conducted, which indicate facility managers believe green buildingsdo have special features that require unique knowledge and skills, and currentlyknowledge gaps do exist hindering the transition towards GFM. Therefore, this paperderives plausible solutions to bridge the knowledge gaps, such as establishing holisticsubsidies for those facility managers participating in training programs of GFM. Thisstudy provides references for researchers and relevant governmental departments tobetter understand industry professionals’ knowledge gaps in the transitioning processtowards a green built environment, and to make better policy decisions bridging theknowledge gaps and thereby facilitating the green transition process.",
author = "Yujie Lu and Ruidong Chang and Dan Chong and Ngiam, {Min Li Joyce}",
note = "doi: 10.3992/1943-4618.13.3.122",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3992/1943-4618.13.3.122",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "122--144",
journal = "Journal of Green Building",
issn = "1552-6100",
publisher = "College Publishing",
number = "3",

}

Transition Towards Green Facility Management: Bridging the Knowledge Gaps of Facilities Managers. / Lu, Yujie; Chang, Ruidong; Chong, Dan; Ngiam, Min Li Joyce.

In: Journal of Green Building, Vol. 13, No. 3, 01.06.2018, p. 122-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Transition Towards Green Facility Management: Bridging the Knowledge Gaps of Facilities Managers

AU - Lu, Yujie

AU - Chang, Ruidong

AU - Chong, Dan

AU - Ngiam, Min Li Joyce

N1 - doi: 10.3992/1943-4618.13.3.122

PY - 2018/6/1

Y1 - 2018/6/1

N2 - The building industry has experienced a widespread transition towards green buildingsand consequently a growing need for green facilities professionals to maximize greenbuilding potential in terms of energy efficiency, water conservation and waste reductionin their operational stage. Green buildings have unique technological systemsthat require facility managers to have relevant knowledge and skills to conduct properfacilities management and maintenance planning to maximize the potential of greenbuildings. It is important, then, to investigate whether knowledge gaps for facilitymanagers exist with respect to green buildings, and if so, how these knowledgegaps could be bridged. Though several studies have investigated the operation andmaintenance processes of green buildings, few studies considered facility managers’knowledge and skills regarding green facility management (GFM). Set in the contextof Singapore, this study aims to holistically investigate the knowledge and skills ofmanaging green buildings in the community of facility managers, including their perceiveddifferences between green and conventional buildings, the difficulty of GFM,the knowledge gaps of GFM and the underlying reasons, as well as how the gaps couldbe bridged. A total of 90 survey responses were collected and eight interviews with keystakeholders were conducted, which indicate facility managers believe green buildingsdo have special features that require unique knowledge and skills, and currentlyknowledge gaps do exist hindering the transition towards GFM. Therefore, this paperderives plausible solutions to bridge the knowledge gaps, such as establishing holisticsubsidies for those facility managers participating in training programs of GFM. Thisstudy provides references for researchers and relevant governmental departments tobetter understand industry professionals’ knowledge gaps in the transitioning processtowards a green built environment, and to make better policy decisions bridging theknowledge gaps and thereby facilitating the green transition process.

AB - The building industry has experienced a widespread transition towards green buildingsand consequently a growing need for green facilities professionals to maximize greenbuilding potential in terms of energy efficiency, water conservation and waste reductionin their operational stage. Green buildings have unique technological systemsthat require facility managers to have relevant knowledge and skills to conduct properfacilities management and maintenance planning to maximize the potential of greenbuildings. It is important, then, to investigate whether knowledge gaps for facilitymanagers exist with respect to green buildings, and if so, how these knowledgegaps could be bridged. Though several studies have investigated the operation andmaintenance processes of green buildings, few studies considered facility managers’knowledge and skills regarding green facility management (GFM). Set in the contextof Singapore, this study aims to holistically investigate the knowledge and skills ofmanaging green buildings in the community of facility managers, including their perceiveddifferences between green and conventional buildings, the difficulty of GFM,the knowledge gaps of GFM and the underlying reasons, as well as how the gaps couldbe bridged. A total of 90 survey responses were collected and eight interviews with keystakeholders were conducted, which indicate facility managers believe green buildingsdo have special features that require unique knowledge and skills, and currentlyknowledge gaps do exist hindering the transition towards GFM. Therefore, this paperderives plausible solutions to bridge the knowledge gaps, such as establishing holisticsubsidies for those facility managers participating in training programs of GFM. Thisstudy provides references for researchers and relevant governmental departments tobetter understand industry professionals’ knowledge gaps in the transitioning processtowards a green built environment, and to make better policy decisions bridging theknowledge gaps and thereby facilitating the green transition process.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85051424681&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3992/1943-4618.13.3.122

DO - 10.3992/1943-4618.13.3.122

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 122

EP - 144

JO - Journal of Green Building

JF - Journal of Green Building

SN - 1552-6100

IS - 3

ER -