Transfusion contracts for Jehovah's witnesesses receiving organ transplants: Ethical necessity or coercive pact?

K. A. Bramstedt*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

[Extract]
Human donor organs (living and cadaveric) continue to be in short supply, and many potential transplant recipients die while waiting for an allograft to become available.1 Because the organ supply is so limited and the offering of organs is based on the generosity of patients and families, proper stewardship of these organs is an ethical obligation for transplant teams, as well as organ recipients. Preventable graft loss must be protected against, and factors that foster preventable graft loss—for example, non‐compliance must be proactively contemplated when patients are reviewed as potential transplant candidates. Post‐transplant treatment refusal is one example of behaviour that can compromise transplant success.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-195
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Medical Ethics
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2006
Externally publishedYes

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