Toward a theory of Aboriginal criminality: A comparison of Aboriginal criminal justice issues in Canada and Australia

Russell Smandych, Robyn Lincoln, Paul Wilson

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

This paper attempts to lay the groundwork for the development of a theory of
aboriginal criminality. As a starting point, the authors examine the state of research
and theorising about the causes of aboriginal involvement in the criminal justice
systems in Canada and Australia. In recent years, criminologists in both Canada and
Australia have carried out a great deal of research aimed at developing policies to
address problems associated with the vast over-representation of aboriginal people
in the criminal justice system. Despite extensive research, no attempt has yet been
made to systematically compare the experience of aboriginal people in the criminal
justice systems of these two countries with the aim of developing a more
generalisable cross-cultural theory. In search of a more adequate theoretical
framework for explaining the apparent similar patterns of criminal justice outcomes
found among aboriginal peoples in Canada, Australia and other countries, the
authors discuss a number of different approaches that can be taken to developing a
cross-cultural theory of aboriginal criminality.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages36
Publication statusPublished - 1993
Event11th International Congress on Criminology: Socio-political change and crime - a challenge of the 21st century - Budapest, Hungary
Duration: 22 Aug 199327 Aug 1993
Conference number: 11th

Conference

Conference11th International Congress on Criminology
CountryHungary
CityBudapest
Period22/08/9327/08/93

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Criminality
cultural theory
justice
Canada
cause
experience

Cite this

Smandych, R., Lincoln, R., & Wilson, P. (1993). Toward a theory of Aboriginal criminality: A comparison of Aboriginal criminal justice issues in Canada and Australia. Paper presented at 11th International Congress on Criminology, Budapest, Hungary.
Smandych, Russell ; Lincoln, Robyn ; Wilson, Paul. / Toward a theory of Aboriginal criminality: A comparison of Aboriginal criminal justice issues in Canada and Australia. Paper presented at 11th International Congress on Criminology, Budapest, Hungary.36 p.
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Smandych, R, Lincoln, R & Wilson, P 1993, 'Toward a theory of Aboriginal criminality: A comparison of Aboriginal criminal justice issues in Canada and Australia' Paper presented at 11th International Congress on Criminology, Budapest, Hungary, 22/08/93 - 27/08/93, .

Toward a theory of Aboriginal criminality: A comparison of Aboriginal criminal justice issues in Canada and Australia. / Smandych, Russell; Lincoln, Robyn; Wilson, Paul.

1993. Paper presented at 11th International Congress on Criminology, Budapest, Hungary.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

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Smandych R, Lincoln R, Wilson P. Toward a theory of Aboriginal criminality: A comparison of Aboriginal criminal justice issues in Canada and Australia. 1993. Paper presented at 11th International Congress on Criminology, Budapest, Hungary.