There is a party in my head and no one is invited: Resting‐state electrocortical activity and solitude

Chengli Huang, James W. Butterworth, Anna J. Finley, Douglas J. Angus, Constantine Sedikides, Nicholas J. Kelley*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
71 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective:
What are the motivational underpinnings of solitude? We know from self-report studies that increases in solitude are associated with drops in approach motivation and rises in avoidance motivation, but only when solitude is experienced as non-self-determined (i.e., non-autonomous). However, the extent to which individual differences in solitude relate to neurophysiological markers of approach–avoidance motivation derived from resting-state electroencephalogram (EEG) is unknown. These markers are Frontal Alpha Asymmetry, beta suppression, and midline Posterior versus Frontal EEG Theta Activity.

Method:
We assessed the relation among individual differences in the reasons for solitude (i.e., preference for solitude, motivation for solitude), approach–avoidance motivation, and resting-state EEG markers of approach–avoidance motivation (N = 115).

Results:
General preference for solitude was negatively related to approach motivation, observed in both self-reported measures and EEG markers of approach motivation. Self-determined solitude was positively related to both self-reported approach motivation and avoidance motivation in the social domain (i.e., friendship). Non-self-determined solitude was negatively associated with self-reported avoidance motivation.

Conclusion:
This research was a preliminary attempt to address the neurophysiological underpinnings of solitude in the context of motivation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-19
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Personality
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Aug 2023

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'There is a party in my head and no one is invited: Resting‐state electrocortical activity and solitude'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this