The view from two sides: a qualitative study of community and medical perspectives on screening for colorectal cancer using FOBT

Alexandra M Clavarino, Monika Janda, Karen L Hughes, C Del Mar, Shilu Tong, Warren R Stanton, Joanne F Aitken, Barbara A Leggett, Beth Newman

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Abstract

Background. Population-wide screening for people at average risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) by faecal occult blood test (FOBT) is under consideration in Australia.

Methods. Qualitative methods were used to examine the views of community members who did (n = 18) or did not (n = 12) participate in a pilot program of FOBT screening. In addition, views were obtained from general practitioners (GPs) and specialist gastroenterologists directly involved in the implementation of the program. Two focus group sessions were conducted with screening participants and interviews were conducted with nonparticipants, GPs and gastroenterologists.

Results. The findings suggest that CRC screening by FOBT distributed to households by mail was well accepted by the community and by the medical practitioners involved in its implementation. The trial had little negative effect on general practice. Both medical practitioners and consumers raised concerns about the efficacy of FOBT screening. Medical practitioners were also concerned about the potential burden mass screening could place on the public (government-funded) health care sector.

Conclusions. It would seem that CRC screening using FOBT will not enjoy unqualified support from the community or from medical practitioners involved in the continuum of screening. Information about the objectives of screening programs, in general, and the efficacy of FOBT screening in particular, needs to be provided to the community to ensure informed individual choice. (C) 2004 The Institute For Cancer Prevention and Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)482-490
Number of pages9
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2004
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Clavarino, Alexandra M ; Janda, Monika ; Hughes, Karen L ; Del Mar, C ; Tong, Shilu ; Stanton, Warren R ; Aitken, Joanne F ; Leggett, Barbara A ; Newman, Beth. / The view from two sides : a qualitative study of community and medical perspectives on screening for colorectal cancer using FOBT. In: Preventive Medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 39, No. 3. pp. 482-490.
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abstract = "Background. Population-wide screening for people at average risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) by faecal occult blood test (FOBT) is under consideration in Australia.Methods. Qualitative methods were used to examine the views of community members who did (n = 18) or did not (n = 12) participate in a pilot program of FOBT screening. In addition, views were obtained from general practitioners (GPs) and specialist gastroenterologists directly involved in the implementation of the program. Two focus group sessions were conducted with screening participants and interviews were conducted with nonparticipants, GPs and gastroenterologists.Results. The findings suggest that CRC screening by FOBT distributed to households by mail was well accepted by the community and by the medical practitioners involved in its implementation. The trial had little negative effect on general practice. Both medical practitioners and consumers raised concerns about the efficacy of FOBT screening. Medical practitioners were also concerned about the potential burden mass screening could place on the public (government-funded) health care sector.Conclusions. It would seem that CRC screening using FOBT will not enjoy unqualified support from the community or from medical practitioners involved in the continuum of screening. Information about the objectives of screening programs, in general, and the efficacy of FOBT screening in particular, needs to be provided to the community to ensure informed individual choice. (C) 2004 The Institute For Cancer Prevention and Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
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Clavarino, AM, Janda, M, Hughes, KL, Del Mar, C, Tong, S, Stanton, WR, Aitken, JF, Leggett, BA & Newman, B 2004, 'The view from two sides: a qualitative study of community and medical perspectives on screening for colorectal cancer using FOBT' Preventive Medicine, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 482-490. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2004.05.015

The view from two sides : a qualitative study of community and medical perspectives on screening for colorectal cancer using FOBT. / Clavarino, Alexandra M; Janda, Monika; Hughes, Karen L; Del Mar, C; Tong, Shilu ; Stanton, Warren R; Aitken, Joanne F; Leggett, Barbara A; Newman, Beth.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 39, No. 3, 09.2004, p. 482-490.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T2 - a qualitative study of community and medical perspectives on screening for colorectal cancer using FOBT

AU - Clavarino, Alexandra M

AU - Janda, Monika

AU - Hughes, Karen L

AU - Del Mar, C

AU - Tong, Shilu

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AU - Aitken, Joanne F

AU - Leggett, Barbara A

AU - Newman, Beth

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N2 - Background. Population-wide screening for people at average risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) by faecal occult blood test (FOBT) is under consideration in Australia.Methods. Qualitative methods were used to examine the views of community members who did (n = 18) or did not (n = 12) participate in a pilot program of FOBT screening. In addition, views were obtained from general practitioners (GPs) and specialist gastroenterologists directly involved in the implementation of the program. Two focus group sessions were conducted with screening participants and interviews were conducted with nonparticipants, GPs and gastroenterologists.Results. The findings suggest that CRC screening by FOBT distributed to households by mail was well accepted by the community and by the medical practitioners involved in its implementation. The trial had little negative effect on general practice. Both medical practitioners and consumers raised concerns about the efficacy of FOBT screening. Medical practitioners were also concerned about the potential burden mass screening could place on the public (government-funded) health care sector.Conclusions. It would seem that CRC screening using FOBT will not enjoy unqualified support from the community or from medical practitioners involved in the continuum of screening. Information about the objectives of screening programs, in general, and the efficacy of FOBT screening in particular, needs to be provided to the community to ensure informed individual choice. (C) 2004 The Institute For Cancer Prevention and Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

AB - Background. Population-wide screening for people at average risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) by faecal occult blood test (FOBT) is under consideration in Australia.Methods. Qualitative methods were used to examine the views of community members who did (n = 18) or did not (n = 12) participate in a pilot program of FOBT screening. In addition, views were obtained from general practitioners (GPs) and specialist gastroenterologists directly involved in the implementation of the program. Two focus group sessions were conducted with screening participants and interviews were conducted with nonparticipants, GPs and gastroenterologists.Results. The findings suggest that CRC screening by FOBT distributed to households by mail was well accepted by the community and by the medical practitioners involved in its implementation. The trial had little negative effect on general practice. Both medical practitioners and consumers raised concerns about the efficacy of FOBT screening. Medical practitioners were also concerned about the potential burden mass screening could place on the public (government-funded) health care sector.Conclusions. It would seem that CRC screening using FOBT will not enjoy unqualified support from the community or from medical practitioners involved in the continuum of screening. Information about the objectives of screening programs, in general, and the efficacy of FOBT screening in particular, needs to be provided to the community to ensure informed individual choice. (C) 2004 The Institute For Cancer Prevention and Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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JO - Preventive Medicine

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