The use of a daily diary system to promote self-monitoring and improve health-related identity and self-efficacy

Dino Urzi, Peta Berenice Stapleton, Hannah Chatwin

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Abstract

Diet and exercise have been shown to have significant importance in predicting both physical and psychological well-being. However, there is little empirical evidence examining the effects of regular practices which encourage awareness on an individual’s health-related identity and self efficacy. This study examined the effects of a daily awareness-based intervention on health-related identity and self-efficacy. Fifty-four adults were allocated into either an 8-week control (n=25) or intervention group(n=29) and all completed a battery of measures designed to assess their health-related identity and self-efficacy. The intervention group were sent a daily email reminder for 8 weeks to log on to a computer website and answer a series of reflective questions. These questions related to the quality and volume of food and liquids consumed throughout the day, their mood, the type, intensity and duration of exercise which they engaged in throughout the day, and the amount of paid or unpaid work hours which they were engaged in throughout the day. Finally, participants were asked daily whether they aimed to achieve balance in any of their regular roles.The control group did not engage in any intervention during the 8-week phase. The ‘daily diary’ website and questions aimed to promote awareness of health behaviours, and results indicated the intervention group displayed a significant improvement in all variables, when compared with the control group.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-28
Number of pages15
JournalGraduate Journal of Sport, Exercise & Physical Education Research
Volume4
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Self Efficacy
Health
Food Quality
Control Groups
Health Behavior
Psychology
Diet

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title = "The use of a daily diary system to promote self-monitoring and improve health-related identity and self-efficacy",
abstract = "Diet and exercise have been shown to have significant importance in predicting both physical and psychological well-being. However, there is little empirical evidence examining the effects of regular practices which encourage awareness on an individual’s health-related identity and self efficacy. This study examined the effects of a daily awareness-based intervention on health-related identity and self-efficacy. Fifty-four adults were allocated into either an 8-week control (n=25) or intervention group(n=29) and all completed a battery of measures designed to assess their health-related identity and self-efficacy. The intervention group were sent a daily email reminder for 8 weeks to log on to a computer website and answer a series of reflective questions. These questions related to the quality and volume of food and liquids consumed throughout the day, their mood, the type, intensity and duration of exercise which they engaged in throughout the day, and the amount of paid or unpaid work hours which they were engaged in throughout the day. Finally, participants were asked daily whether they aimed to achieve balance in any of their regular roles.The control group did not engage in any intervention during the 8-week phase. The ‘daily diary’ website and questions aimed to promote awareness of health behaviours, and results indicated the intervention group displayed a significant improvement in all variables, when compared with the control group.",
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The use of a daily diary system to promote self-monitoring and improve health-related identity and self-efficacy. / Urzi, Dino; Stapleton, Peta Berenice; Chatwin, Hannah.

In: Graduate Journal of Sport, Exercise & Physical Education Research, Vol. 4, 2016, p. 14-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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