The serious and ongoing issue of needlestick in Australian healthcare settings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Australian healthcare workers and especially nurses repeatedly have their safety and health jeopardized through occupational exposures to blood and body fluids. Percutaneous or needlestick injuries are especially concerning and consistent. The purpose of this article is to again draw attention to the serious and costly issue of needlestick injuries in Australian healthcare settings. Specifically it considers the context of needlestick injuries and safety engineered devices within Standard 3 of the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care's National Standards reform agenda. Given that Standard 3 alone will likely be insufficient to reduce needlestick injuries, this article also discusses improvements and current challenges in international needlestick injury reduction in an attempt to stimulate key opinion leader consideration of Australia adopting similar strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)295-299
Number of pages5
JournalCollegian
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Needlestick Injuries
Delivery of Health Care
Protective Devices
Safety
Quality of Health Care
Body Fluids
Occupational Exposure
Standard of Care
Nurses
Health

Cite this

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The serious and ongoing issue of needlestick in Australian healthcare settings. / Murphy, Cathryn L.

In: Collegian, Vol. 21, No. 4, 2014, p. 295-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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