The Satisfaction with Communication in Everyday Speaking Situations (SCESS) scale: An overarching outcome measure of treatment effect

Hamid Karimi, Mark Onslow, Mark Jones, Sue O'Brian, Ann Packman, Ross Menzies, Sheena Reilly, Martin Sommer, Suzana Jelčić-Jakšić

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement strongly suggests one primary outcome for clinical trials, yet the outcomes of stuttering treatments span numerous behavioral and psychosocial domains. That presents a roadblock to eventual meta-analysis of clinical trials for adults who stutter. Method: We propose a simple and convenient outcome measure for clinical trials of stuttering treatment for adults that spans whatever behavioral and psychosocial factors might impel clients to seek treatment: a nine-point scale of Satisfaction with Communication in Everyday Speaking Situations (SCESS). The scale consists of one question which is simple, brief, easy to administer, cost-free, and translatable into many languages. The present report develops the SCESS scale by determining its reliability, content validity, and construct validity. Results: Reliability, content validity, and construct validity of the SCESS were confirmed with statistically significant and substantive correlations with speech-related and anxiety-related measures. However, the SCESS did not correlate well with percentage syllables stuttered. Three behavioral and psychosocial measures had the highest correlation with the SCESS: total Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience of Stuttering, self-reported stuttering severity, and Unhelpful Thoughts and Beliefs about Stuttering. Conclusion: The SCESS measure has potential to be applied as an overarching clinical trial outcome measure of stuttering treatment effect. This study provides some preliminary evidence for including it as a primary or secondary outcome in clinical trials of adult stuttering treatments. However, further studies are needed to establish the SCESS responsiveness to different stuttering treatments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)77-85
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Fluency Disorders
Volume58
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Stuttering
speaking
Communication
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
communication
Clinical Trials
construct validity
Reproducibility of Results
psychosocial factors
Treatment Effects
Meta-Analysis
Stuttering Treatment
Language
anxiety
Anxiety
Psychology
Costs and Cost Analysis
costs
language

Cite this

Karimi, Hamid ; Onslow, Mark ; Jones, Mark ; O'Brian, Sue ; Packman, Ann ; Menzies, Ross ; Reilly, Sheena ; Sommer, Martin ; Jelčić-Jakšić, Suzana. / The Satisfaction with Communication in Everyday Speaking Situations (SCESS) scale : An overarching outcome measure of treatment effect. In: Journal of Fluency Disorders. 2018 ; Vol. 58. pp. 77-85.
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abstract = "Purpose: The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement strongly suggests one primary outcome for clinical trials, yet the outcomes of stuttering treatments span numerous behavioral and psychosocial domains. That presents a roadblock to eventual meta-analysis of clinical trials for adults who stutter. Method: We propose a simple and convenient outcome measure for clinical trials of stuttering treatment for adults that spans whatever behavioral and psychosocial factors might impel clients to seek treatment: a nine-point scale of Satisfaction with Communication in Everyday Speaking Situations (SCESS). The scale consists of one question which is simple, brief, easy to administer, cost-free, and translatable into many languages. The present report develops the SCESS scale by determining its reliability, content validity, and construct validity. Results: Reliability, content validity, and construct validity of the SCESS were confirmed with statistically significant and substantive correlations with speech-related and anxiety-related measures. However, the SCESS did not correlate well with percentage syllables stuttered. Three behavioral and psychosocial measures had the highest correlation with the SCESS: total Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience of Stuttering, self-reported stuttering severity, and Unhelpful Thoughts and Beliefs about Stuttering. Conclusion: The SCESS measure has potential to be applied as an overarching clinical trial outcome measure of stuttering treatment effect. This study provides some preliminary evidence for including it as a primary or secondary outcome in clinical trials of adult stuttering treatments. However, further studies are needed to establish the SCESS responsiveness to different stuttering treatments.",
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The Satisfaction with Communication in Everyday Speaking Situations (SCESS) scale : An overarching outcome measure of treatment effect. / Karimi, Hamid; Onslow, Mark; Jones, Mark; O'Brian, Sue; Packman, Ann; Menzies, Ross; Reilly, Sheena; Sommer, Martin; Jelčić-Jakšić, Suzana.

In: Journal of Fluency Disorders, Vol. 58, 01.12.2018, p. 77-85.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Packman, Ann

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AU - Sommer, Martin

AU - Jelčić-Jakšić, Suzana

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