The Salience of Market, Bureaucratic, and Clan Controls in the Management of Family Firm Transitions: Some Tentative Australian Evidence

Ken Moores, Joseph Mula

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the numerical and economic significance of family businesses to Australia, they are not extensively researched. This paper reports some of the results from a nationwide study of Australian family-owned businesses that sought to ascertain and understand their management and control practices. In particular, the paper assesses the organizational transitions of Australian family firms in terms of their dominant control practices. These control measures are evaluated according to Ouchi's classification of market, bureaucratic, and clan controls. The salience of these different forms of control serves to identify distinctive patterns that define periods of organizational passage (life cycles).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-106
Number of pages16
JournalFamily Business Review
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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Family firms
Life cycle
Economic significance
Family business
Family-owned business

Cite this

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The Salience of Market, Bureaucratic, and Clan Controls in the Management of Family Firm Transitions : Some Tentative Australian Evidence. / Moores, Ken; Mula, Joseph.

In: Family Business Review, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2000, p. 91-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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