The research on hot-desking and activity-based work isn’t so positive

Research output: Contribution to journalOnline ResourceResearch

Abstract

A recent survey of 400 multinational corporations found that two-thirds plan to implement shared-desk workplaces by 2020. But research shows these arrangements have a range of outcomes, many of which are negative.

A recently published study of 1,000 Australian employees found that shared-desk environments had a number of problems. These included increased distrust, distractions, uncooperative behaviour and negative relationships. On top of this, there was a decreased perception of support from supervisors.
Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Conversation
Publication statusPublished - 12 Apr 2017

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Employees
Multinational corporations
Work place
Supervisors
Distrust

Cite this

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abstract = "A recent survey of 400 multinational corporations found that two-thirds plan to implement shared-desk workplaces by 2020. But research shows these arrangements have a range of outcomes, many of which are negative.A recently published study of 1,000 Australian employees found that shared-desk environments had a number of problems. These included increased distrust, distractions, uncooperative behaviour and negative relationships. On top of this, there was a decreased perception of support from supervisors.",
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The research on hot-desking and activity-based work isn’t so positive. / Sander, Elizabeth J.

In: The Conversation, 12.04.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalOnline ResourceResearch

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