The relationship between motor proficiency and reading ability in year 1 children: A prospective cohort study

Nikki Milne, Kaitlin Cacciotti, K. Davies, Rob Marc Orr

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Question: Is there a relationship between motor proficiency and reading
skills in Year 1 children?
Design: Prospective cohort study.
Participants: A single class of Year 1 students (n=24) aged 5 to 7 years
(females n=11; males n=13, mean age=6.07±0.35 years).
Outcome Measures: The Process Assessment of the Learner (PALII)
(reading components only); the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor
Proficiency – 2nd Edition; parent-reported height/weight measurements;
and retrospective academic reports from Preparatory year were assessed
during regular class time.
Results: For children with high-to-very-high English grades, moderate
negative associations were identified between total motor proficiency
and reading skills (silent reading fluency SSF: r=-.682, p=0.01, sentence
comprehension SSA: r=-.596, p=0.03). For children with average-to-low
English grades, a stronger negative relationship existed between total
motor proficiency and silent reading fluency (SSF: r=-.815, p=0.48),
however moderate positive relationships were also found between total
motor proficiency and reading skills (phonological decoding fluency:
r=0.716, p=0.02 and phonological decoding accuracy: r=.670, p=0.34) for
this group.
Conclusion: These study results suggest that a relationship between
motor proficiency and key reading skills exists, particularly in children
with average-to-low English grades. Further research is warranted to
investigate if interventions focused on motor skill development can
enhance reading ability for Year 1 children.
Key Practice Points:
• Positive associations exist between physical activity and increased
academic performance.
• Investigating the links between children’s motor proficiency and reading
outcomes may help provide optimal academic outcomes, particularly for
those struggling to read.
• This study suggests a relationship between motor proficiency and
reading exists in young children.
Original languageEnglish
Pages103
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2015
EventThe Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015: Connect - Gold Coast, Australia
Duration: 3 Oct 20156 Oct 2015
Conference number: 2015
http://www.physiotherapy.asn.au/Conference2015

Conference

ConferenceThe Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015
Abbreviated titleAPA
CountryAustralia
CityGold Coast
Period3/10/156/10/15
Internet address

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Aptitude
Reading
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Motor Skills
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Exercise
Students
Weights and Measures
Research

Cite this

Milne, N., Cacciotti, K., Davies, K., & Orr, R. M. (2015). The relationship between motor proficiency and reading ability in year 1 children: A prospective cohort study. 103. Abstract from The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.
Milne, Nikki ; Cacciotti, Kaitlin ; Davies, K. ; Orr, Rob Marc. / The relationship between motor proficiency and reading ability in year 1 children : A prospective cohort study. Abstract from The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.1 p.
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Milne, N, Cacciotti, K, Davies, K & Orr, RM 2015, 'The relationship between motor proficiency and reading ability in year 1 children: A prospective cohort study' The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia, 3/10/15 - 6/10/15, pp. 103.

The relationship between motor proficiency and reading ability in year 1 children : A prospective cohort study. / Milne, Nikki; Cacciotti, Kaitlin; Davies, K.; Orr, Rob Marc.

2015. 103 Abstract from The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - The relationship between motor proficiency and reading ability in year 1 children

T2 - A prospective cohort study

AU - Milne, Nikki

AU - Cacciotti, Kaitlin

AU - Davies, K.

AU - Orr, Rob Marc

PY - 2015/10

Y1 - 2015/10

N2 - Question: Is there a relationship between motor proficiency and readingskills in Year 1 children?Design: Prospective cohort study.Participants: A single class of Year 1 students (n=24) aged 5 to 7 years(females n=11; males n=13, mean age=6.07±0.35 years).Outcome Measures: The Process Assessment of the Learner (PALII)(reading components only); the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of MotorProficiency – 2nd Edition; parent-reported height/weight measurements;and retrospective academic reports from Preparatory year were assessedduring regular class time.Results: For children with high-to-very-high English grades, moderatenegative associations were identified between total motor proficiencyand reading skills (silent reading fluency SSF: r=-.682, p=0.01, sentencecomprehension SSA: r=-.596, p=0.03). For children with average-to-lowEnglish grades, a stronger negative relationship existed between totalmotor proficiency and silent reading fluency (SSF: r=-.815, p=0.48),however moderate positive relationships were also found between totalmotor proficiency and reading skills (phonological decoding fluency:r=0.716, p=0.02 and phonological decoding accuracy: r=.670, p=0.34) forthis group.Conclusion: These study results suggest that a relationship betweenmotor proficiency and key reading skills exists, particularly in childrenwith average-to-low English grades. Further research is warranted toinvestigate if interventions focused on motor skill development canenhance reading ability for Year 1 children.Key Practice Points:• Positive associations exist between physical activity and increasedacademic performance.• Investigating the links between children’s motor proficiency and readingoutcomes may help provide optimal academic outcomes, particularly forthose struggling to read.• This study suggests a relationship between motor proficiency andreading exists in young children.

AB - Question: Is there a relationship between motor proficiency and readingskills in Year 1 children?Design: Prospective cohort study.Participants: A single class of Year 1 students (n=24) aged 5 to 7 years(females n=11; males n=13, mean age=6.07±0.35 years).Outcome Measures: The Process Assessment of the Learner (PALII)(reading components only); the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of MotorProficiency – 2nd Edition; parent-reported height/weight measurements;and retrospective academic reports from Preparatory year were assessedduring regular class time.Results: For children with high-to-very-high English grades, moderatenegative associations were identified between total motor proficiencyand reading skills (silent reading fluency SSF: r=-.682, p=0.01, sentencecomprehension SSA: r=-.596, p=0.03). For children with average-to-lowEnglish grades, a stronger negative relationship existed between totalmotor proficiency and silent reading fluency (SSF: r=-.815, p=0.48),however moderate positive relationships were also found between totalmotor proficiency and reading skills (phonological decoding fluency:r=0.716, p=0.02 and phonological decoding accuracy: r=.670, p=0.34) forthis group.Conclusion: These study results suggest that a relationship betweenmotor proficiency and key reading skills exists, particularly in childrenwith average-to-low English grades. Further research is warranted toinvestigate if interventions focused on motor skill development canenhance reading ability for Year 1 children.Key Practice Points:• Positive associations exist between physical activity and increasedacademic performance.• Investigating the links between children’s motor proficiency and readingoutcomes may help provide optimal academic outcomes, particularly forthose struggling to read.• This study suggests a relationship between motor proficiency andreading exists in young children.

M3 - Abstract

SP - 103

ER -

Milne N, Cacciotti K, Davies K, Orr RM. The relationship between motor proficiency and reading ability in year 1 children: A prospective cohort study. 2015. Abstract from The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.