The relationship between motor proficiency and reading ability in year 1 children: A prospective cohort study

Nikki Milne, Kaitlin Cacciotti, K. Davies, Rob Marc Orr

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Question: Is there a relationship between motor proficiency and reading
skills in Year 1 children?
Design: Prospective cohort study.
Participants: A single class of Year 1 students (n=24) aged 5 to 7 years
(females n=11; males n=13, mean age=6.07±0.35 years).
Outcome Measures: The Process Assessment of the Learner (PALII)
(reading components only); the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor
Proficiency – 2nd Edition; parent-reported height/weight measurements;
and retrospective academic reports from Preparatory year were assessed
during regular class time.
Results: For children with high-to-very-high English grades, moderate
negative associations were identified between total motor proficiency
and reading skills (silent reading fluency SSF: r=-.682, p=0.01, sentence
comprehension SSA: r=-.596, p=0.03). For children with average-to-low
English grades, a stronger negative relationship existed between total
motor proficiency and silent reading fluency (SSF: r=-.815, p=0.48),
however moderate positive relationships were also found between total
motor proficiency and reading skills (phonological decoding fluency:
r=0.716, p=0.02 and phonological decoding accuracy: r=.670, p=0.34) for
this group.
Conclusion: These study results suggest that a relationship between
motor proficiency and key reading skills exists, particularly in children
with average-to-low English grades. Further research is warranted to
investigate if interventions focused on motor skill development can
enhance reading ability for Year 1 children.
Key Practice Points:
• Positive associations exist between physical activity and increased
academic performance.
• Investigating the links between children’s motor proficiency and reading
outcomes may help provide optimal academic outcomes, particularly for
those struggling to read.
• This study suggests a relationship between motor proficiency and
reading exists in young children.
Original languageEnglish
Pages103
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2015
EventCONNECT 2015 Physiotherapy Conference - Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre, Gold Coast, Australia
Duration: 3 Oct 20156 Oct 2015
http://www.physiotherapy.asn.au/conference2015
https://issuu.com/graydesigngroup/docs/apa_symposium_2015_ebook_program_a4 (Conference Program)
https://issuu.com/graydesigngroup/docs/apa_2015_conference_abstracts_handb (Book of Abstracts)

Conference

ConferenceCONNECT 2015 Physiotherapy Conference
Abbreviated titleAPA 2015
CountryAustralia
CityGold Coast
Period3/10/156/10/15
Internet address

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    Milne, N., Cacciotti, K., Davies, K., & Orr, R. M. (2015). The relationship between motor proficiency and reading ability in year 1 children: A prospective cohort study. 103. Abstract from CONNECT 2015 Physiotherapy Conference, Gold Coast, Australia.