The relationship between dry-land resistance training and start performance in competitive swimming

Shiqi Thng, Simon Pearson, Justin W L Keogh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to review the literature on the relationship between dry-land resistance training and swim start performance in competitive swimming. It is common practice in competitive swimming to use dry-land resistance training to increase muscular strength and power. Given the explosive nature of the swim start, it would appear that high levels of lower body muscular strength and power are necessary to enhance this component in swimming. Performance in total body jumping exercises shared a stronger relationship to start performance than single joint exercises. This may reflect the requirement for force and power to be developed across multiple joints in the swim start.
Original languageEnglish
Article number224
Pages (from-to)927-930
Number of pages4
JournalISBS Proceedings Archive
Volume36
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2018
EventThe 36th International Conference on Biomechanics in Sports 2018 - Sir Paul Reeves Building, 55 Wellesley Street East, Auckland University of Technology (AUT) City Campus, Auckland., Auckland, New Zealand
Duration: 10 Sep 201814 Sep 2018
Conference number: 36th
https://sprinz.aut.ac.nz/isbs-2018 (Conference website)
https://www.facebook.com/ISBS2018/ (Facebook)

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The relationship between dry-land resistance training and start performance in competitive swimming. / Thng, Shiqi; Pearson, Simon; Keogh, Justin W L.

In: ISBS Proceedings Archive, Vol. 36, No. 1, 224, 2018, p. 927-930.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AB - The purpose of this study was to review the literature on the relationship between dry-land resistance training and swim start performance in competitive swimming. It is common practice in competitive swimming to use dry-land resistance training to increase muscular strength and power. Given the explosive nature of the swim start, it would appear that high levels of lower body muscular strength and power are necessary to enhance this component in swimming. Performance in total body jumping exercises shared a stronger relationship to start performance than single joint exercises. This may reflect the requirement for force and power to be developed across multiple joints in the swim start.

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