The Propagation of Rework Benchmark Metrics for Construction

Peter Love, Jim Smith, H. li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract


Australian construction organisations have generally refrained from implementing quality management principles. As a result, little is known about the costs of poor quality and the impact it has on an organisation’s performance and competitiveness. With respect to rework, it is suggested that most organisations have learnt to accept it as part of their operations, inasmuch as they have not realised its true extent or its influence on their own and a project’s performance. This paper uses a case study approach to develop a series of benchmark metrics for the causes and costs of rework, which were derived from two construction projects that were procured by the same contractor using different procurement methods. From the findings a conceptual model for benchmarking and reducing rework throughout the quality‐chain is presented and discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)638
Number of pages658
JournalInternational Journal of Quality and Reliability Management
Volume16
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Propagation
Rework
Benchmark
Costs
Organizational performance
Construction project
Quality management
Procurement
Conceptual model
Project performance
Competitiveness
Contractors
Benchmarking

Cite this

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The Propagation of Rework Benchmark Metrics for Construction. / Love, Peter; Smith, Jim; li, H.

In: International Journal of Quality and Reliability Management, Vol. 16, No. 7, 1999, p. 638.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Smith, Jim

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DO - 10.1108/02656719910249829

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