The “NYSE Premium”: Decomposing the “US Premium” in compensation for CEOs of cross-listed firms

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Abstract

That American CEOs earn significantly more than their counterparts in other countries has been widelydocumented. The current study reveals that the “US premium” might be more accurately labelled the“NYSE premium”. Focusing on the constituent firms of the S&P/TSX Composite Index (the largest Canadian firms of which almost half are cross-listed on US exchanges) and after controlling for firm size,industry, and other firm level characteristics, the average premium paid to CEOs of Canadian firms listed on the NYSE was approximately 100% while the CEOs of Canadian firms listed on the Nasdaq or AMEX received no premium, when compared to CEOs of firms listed only on the TSX. Over time, the average NYSE premium has decreased from 130% in 1998 to 90% in 2010, consistent with the convergence of CEO compensation to US standards. However, there was a Nasdaq premium of 48% in 1998 which had become a Nasdaq discount of 65% by 2010, coinciding with an mass exodus of Canadian firms from the Nasdaq.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 28th Australasian Finance and Banking Conference
EditorsF. Moshirian
Place of PublicationSydney
PublisherUNSW Press
Pages1-14
Number of pages14
ISBN (Print)9780987312778
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Event28th Australasian Finance and Banking Conference - Sydney, Sydney, Australia
Duration: 16 Dec 201518 Dec 2015
Conference number: 28th
https://www.business.unsw.edu.au/about/schools/banking-finance/seminars-conferences/australasian-finance-banking-conference/28th-australasian-finance-and-banking-conference

Conference

Conference28th Australasian Finance and Banking Conference
CountryAustralia
CitySydney
Period16/12/1518/12/15
Internet address

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Chief executive officer
New York Stock Exchange
Premium
Nasdaq
CEO compensation
Industry
Composite index
Firm size
Discount

Cite this

Southam, C. (2016). The “NYSE Premium”: Decomposing the “US Premium” in compensation for CEOs of cross-listed firms. In F. Moshirian (Ed.), Proceedings of the 28th Australasian Finance and Banking Conference (pp. 1-14). Sydney: UNSW Press.
Southam, Colette. / The “NYSE Premium”: Decomposing the “US Premium” in compensation for CEOs of cross-listed firms. Proceedings of the 28th Australasian Finance and Banking Conference. editor / F. Moshirian. Sydney : UNSW Press, 2016. pp. 1-14
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Southam, C 2016, The “NYSE Premium”: Decomposing the “US Premium” in compensation for CEOs of cross-listed firms. in F Moshirian (ed.), Proceedings of the 28th Australasian Finance and Banking Conference. UNSW Press, Sydney, pp. 1-14, 28th Australasian Finance and Banking Conference, Sydney, Australia, 16/12/15.

The “NYSE Premium”: Decomposing the “US Premium” in compensation for CEOs of cross-listed firms. / Southam, Colette.

Proceedings of the 28th Australasian Finance and Banking Conference. ed. / F. Moshirian. Sydney : UNSW Press, 2016. p. 1-14.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

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Southam C. The “NYSE Premium”: Decomposing the “US Premium” in compensation for CEOs of cross-listed firms. In Moshirian F, editor, Proceedings of the 28th Australasian Finance and Banking Conference. Sydney: UNSW Press. 2016. p. 1-14