The news triumvirate: Public relations, wire agencies and online copy

Susan Forde, Jane Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

News agencies, or wire services, are playing a growing role in the contemporary news environment, primarily due to the prevalence of the 24/7 online newsroom and its associated need for speed and volumes of copy. At the same time press releases and other public relations-generated material daily flood the news environment. This paper builds on research into these two fields, trialling a new methodology-one which follows press releases and other public relations material through the uptake by news agencies, in particular the Australian Associated Press, and finally, as published stories in metropolitan online newspapers. While previous research has tracked press releases and news agency copy individually, this study is significant because it follows the three distinct phases in the news cycle and determines how the news agency-the most pervasive and trusted news source-can become the de facto distributor of public relations material. It grounds the study in the work of political economists, who have endeavoured since the 1970s to explain the dwindling quality and quantity of good journalism in leading democracies. This work sets the foundations for a larger study into the production of news in contemporary media environments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)113-129
Number of pages17
JournalJournalism Studies
Volume14
Issue number1
Early online date10 May 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Public relations
news agency
news
Wire
journalism
economist
natural disaster
newspaper
democracy
methodology

Cite this

Forde, Susan ; Johnston, Jane. / The news triumvirate: Public relations, wire agencies and online copy. In: Journalism Studies. 2013 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 113-129.
@article{6c8feadd6f1e4f069685fe0cae6b56c9,
title = "The news triumvirate: Public relations, wire agencies and online copy",
abstract = "News agencies, or wire services, are playing a growing role in the contemporary news environment, primarily due to the prevalence of the 24/7 online newsroom and its associated need for speed and volumes of copy. At the same time press releases and other public relations-generated material daily flood the news environment. This paper builds on research into these two fields, trialling a new methodology-one which follows press releases and other public relations material through the uptake by news agencies, in particular the Australian Associated Press, and finally, as published stories in metropolitan online newspapers. While previous research has tracked press releases and news agency copy individually, this study is significant because it follows the three distinct phases in the news cycle and determines how the news agency-the most pervasive and trusted news source-can become the de facto distributor of public relations material. It grounds the study in the work of political economists, who have endeavoured since the 1970s to explain the dwindling quality and quantity of good journalism in leading democracies. This work sets the foundations for a larger study into the production of news in contemporary media environments.",
author = "Susan Forde and Jane Johnston",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1080/1461670X.2012.679859",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "113--129",
journal = "Journalism Studies",
issn = "1461-670X",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

The news triumvirate: Public relations, wire agencies and online copy. / Forde, Susan; Johnston, Jane.

In: Journalism Studies, Vol. 14, No. 1, 2013, p. 113-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The news triumvirate: Public relations, wire agencies and online copy

AU - Forde, Susan

AU - Johnston, Jane

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - News agencies, or wire services, are playing a growing role in the contemporary news environment, primarily due to the prevalence of the 24/7 online newsroom and its associated need for speed and volumes of copy. At the same time press releases and other public relations-generated material daily flood the news environment. This paper builds on research into these two fields, trialling a new methodology-one which follows press releases and other public relations material through the uptake by news agencies, in particular the Australian Associated Press, and finally, as published stories in metropolitan online newspapers. While previous research has tracked press releases and news agency copy individually, this study is significant because it follows the three distinct phases in the news cycle and determines how the news agency-the most pervasive and trusted news source-can become the de facto distributor of public relations material. It grounds the study in the work of political economists, who have endeavoured since the 1970s to explain the dwindling quality and quantity of good journalism in leading democracies. This work sets the foundations for a larger study into the production of news in contemporary media environments.

AB - News agencies, or wire services, are playing a growing role in the contemporary news environment, primarily due to the prevalence of the 24/7 online newsroom and its associated need for speed and volumes of copy. At the same time press releases and other public relations-generated material daily flood the news environment. This paper builds on research into these two fields, trialling a new methodology-one which follows press releases and other public relations material through the uptake by news agencies, in particular the Australian Associated Press, and finally, as published stories in metropolitan online newspapers. While previous research has tracked press releases and news agency copy individually, this study is significant because it follows the three distinct phases in the news cycle and determines how the news agency-the most pervasive and trusted news source-can become the de facto distributor of public relations material. It grounds the study in the work of political economists, who have endeavoured since the 1970s to explain the dwindling quality and quantity of good journalism in leading democracies. This work sets the foundations for a larger study into the production of news in contemporary media environments.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84871307056&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/1461670X.2012.679859

DO - 10.1080/1461670X.2012.679859

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 113

EP - 129

JO - Journalism Studies

JF - Journalism Studies

SN - 1461-670X

IS - 1

ER -