The market premium for the option to close: Evidence from Australian gold mining firms

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This paper assesses whether the market valuation of gold mining firms contain a premium for the option to close. Tests of whether observed market values incorporate operating flexibility is central to our understanding of the processes that drive market values and has implications for the relevance and suitability of known theoretical pricing frameworks. This paper assesses the relevancy of the option to close for mining firm valuation. This is achieved by examining 41 Australian gold mining firms listed on the Australian Stock Exchange from 1987 to 1994 that are actively engaged in gold mining extraction and production. A pooled cross-sectional regression analysis analyses 234 firm-year observations to identify the degree of association between the actual (market determined) and theoretical option premiums on the basis of the overall sample. Further robustness checks are then undertaken for sub-sample quartiles ranked on a specific firm characteristic, moneyness. This results show that market prices incorporate a premium that reflects the option to temporarily close operations. A significant portion (73.8%) of the market-assessed value of mining operations is captured by the Hotelling Valuation Principle. The difference between the present value of expected future cash flows and the market value of mining operations is accounted for by the options to close (R2 = 62.7%). Further, the existence and magnitude of the option premium to close is dependent on other observable attributes of the mining firm, specifically the degree of moneyness of the firm's operations.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages38
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes
EventEuropean Finance Association Annual Meeting - Maastricht , Netherlands
Duration: 18 Aug 200421 Aug 2004
Conference number: 31st
http://european-finance.org/r/annual-meetings-overview

Conference

ConferenceEuropean Finance Association Annual Meeting
Abbreviated titleEFA
CountryNetherlands
CityMaastricht
Period18/08/0421/08/04
Internet address

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Gold mining
Premium
Market value
Regression analysis
Market price
Firm-specific characteristics
Cash flow
Hotelling
Firm valuation
Present value
Robustness
Australian Stock Exchange
Pricing
Cross-sectional regression
Market valuation

Cite this

Kelly, S. (2004). The market premium for the option to close: Evidence from Australian gold mining firms. Paper presented at European Finance Association Annual Meeting , Maastricht , Netherlands.
Kelly, Simone. / The market premium for the option to close : Evidence from Australian gold mining firms. Paper presented at European Finance Association Annual Meeting , Maastricht , Netherlands.38 p.
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year = "2004",
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Kelly, S 2004, 'The market premium for the option to close: Evidence from Australian gold mining firms' Paper presented at European Finance Association Annual Meeting , Maastricht , Netherlands, 18/08/04 - 21/08/04, .

The market premium for the option to close : Evidence from Australian gold mining firms. / Kelly, Simone.

2004. Paper presented at European Finance Association Annual Meeting , Maastricht , Netherlands.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - The market premium for the option to close

T2 - Evidence from Australian gold mining firms

AU - Kelly, Simone

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - This paper assesses whether the market valuation of gold mining firms contain a premium for the option to close. Tests of whether observed market values incorporate operating flexibility is central to our understanding of the processes that drive market values and has implications for the relevance and suitability of known theoretical pricing frameworks. This paper assesses the relevancy of the option to close for mining firm valuation. This is achieved by examining 41 Australian gold mining firms listed on the Australian Stock Exchange from 1987 to 1994 that are actively engaged in gold mining extraction and production. A pooled cross-sectional regression analysis analyses 234 firm-year observations to identify the degree of association between the actual (market determined) and theoretical option premiums on the basis of the overall sample. Further robustness checks are then undertaken for sub-sample quartiles ranked on a specific firm characteristic, moneyness. This results show that market prices incorporate a premium that reflects the option to temporarily close operations. A significant portion (73.8%) of the market-assessed value of mining operations is captured by the Hotelling Valuation Principle. The difference between the present value of expected future cash flows and the market value of mining operations is accounted for by the options to close (R2 = 62.7%). Further, the existence and magnitude of the option premium to close is dependent on other observable attributes of the mining firm, specifically the degree of moneyness of the firm's operations.

AB - This paper assesses whether the market valuation of gold mining firms contain a premium for the option to close. Tests of whether observed market values incorporate operating flexibility is central to our understanding of the processes that drive market values and has implications for the relevance and suitability of known theoretical pricing frameworks. This paper assesses the relevancy of the option to close for mining firm valuation. This is achieved by examining 41 Australian gold mining firms listed on the Australian Stock Exchange from 1987 to 1994 that are actively engaged in gold mining extraction and production. A pooled cross-sectional regression analysis analyses 234 firm-year observations to identify the degree of association between the actual (market determined) and theoretical option premiums on the basis of the overall sample. Further robustness checks are then undertaken for sub-sample quartiles ranked on a specific firm characteristic, moneyness. This results show that market prices incorporate a premium that reflects the option to temporarily close operations. A significant portion (73.8%) of the market-assessed value of mining operations is captured by the Hotelling Valuation Principle. The difference between the present value of expected future cash flows and the market value of mining operations is accounted for by the options to close (R2 = 62.7%). Further, the existence and magnitude of the option premium to close is dependent on other observable attributes of the mining firm, specifically the degree of moneyness of the firm's operations.

M3 - Paper

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Kelly S. The market premium for the option to close: Evidence from Australian gold mining firms. 2004. Paper presented at European Finance Association Annual Meeting , Maastricht , Netherlands.