The liberalization of regulatory structure of complementary and alternative medicine: Implications for consumers and professions

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Abstract

Over the past 30 years there has been a rapid development in the regulatory structure for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in many western countries. Focusing primarily on Australia (with reference and in comparison to Canada and the United States), this chapter argues that the reform of the regulatory structure since the 1970s, a development driven by economic imperatives among a number of complex factors (for discussion of wider societal changes linked to CAM, see Chapters 1 and 2), has resulted in CAM no longer being subject to overly restrictive legislative restrictions. The implications of this liberalization of regulatory structure for consumers, CAM therapists, orthodox medicine and patients are also considered.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTraditional, complementary and integrative medicine
Subtitle of host publicationAn international reader
EditorsJ Adams, G Andrews, J Barnes, A Broom, P Magin
Place of PublicationUK
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages220-227
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)9780230232655
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Weir, M. (2012). The liberalization of regulatory structure of complementary and alternative medicine: Implications for consumers and professions. In J. Adams, G. Andrews, J. Barnes, A. Broom, & P. Magin (Eds.), Traditional, complementary and integrative medicine: An international reader (pp. 220-227). UK: Palgrave Macmillan.