The impact of post-prandial delay periods on ad libitum consumption of a laboratory breakfast meal

Blake Palmer, Christopher Irwin, Danielle McCartney, Gregory Ronald Cox, Ben Desbrow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This study examined the impact of varying the holding time following an ad libitum laboratory breakfast on acute dietary behaviour and subsequent intake. 24 participants (20 females (age: 23.4±6.3 y; BMI: 23.9±3.9 kg·m-2, mean±SD)) completed three trials following a quasi-randomized, crossover design. Each trial (seven day separation) incorporated a defined post-prandial delay (DPD) period of either zero (no delay), one or three hours following a buffet breakfast consumed over 30-minutes. Dietary intake outcomes included energy, macronutrient and core food group intakes. On completion of the DPD period, participants left the laboratory and recorded all food/beverages consumed for the remainder of the day. One-way repeated-measures ANOVA assessed all outcomes, with post hoc analysis conducted on significant main effects. Energy and carbohydrate intakes were significantly lower on no delay vs one hour (p = 0.014) and three hour (p = 0.06) DPD trials (EI: 1853±814 kJ vs. 2250±1345 kJ vs. 1948±1289 kJ; CHO: 68±34 g vs. 77±44 vs. 69±43 g; respectively). DPD periods did not influence the time to consume next meal or energy, macronutrient and core food group intakes for the remainder of the day. Delaying participants from leaving a laboratory alters dietary intake at an ad libitum test meal. The post-meal holding period is an important methodological consideration when planning laboratory studies to assess appetite. Novelty Bullets: 1. Delaying participants from leaving a laboratory alters dietary intake at ad libitum breakfast meals. 2. The length of the delay period did not affect dietary intake at ad libitum breakfast meals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1290-1297
Number of pages8
JournalCanadian Journal of Applied Physiology
Volume46
Issue number10
Early online date13 May 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The impact of post-prandial delay periods on ad libitum consumption of a laboratory breakfast meal'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this