The impact of external loads carried by police officers on vertical jump performance

Amy Wiley, Aaron Joseph, Rob Marc Orr, Ben Schram, Charles Kornhauser, Ryan Holmes, James Dawes

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Abstract

INTRODUCTIONPolice officers require a high level of lower limb power to complete occupational tasks. Deficits inlower limb power have been linked to an increased risk of injury in this population. With the additionof around 10 kg of external loads that police officers are required to carry, it is thought that theability to perform explosive, power-based movements may be impacted. The purpose of this studywas to examine the impact that external loads carried by police officers had on their vertical jump(VJ) height and peak anaerobic power output (PAPw).METHODSRetrospective data of 47 (mean age = 38.79 ± 7.97 years) police officers from a US Law EnforcementAgency (LEA) were used for analysis. Officers completed a VJ dressed either in gym clothing or in fullduty attire and occupational loads (9.57 ± 0.94 kg, range 7.08 – 12.02 kg). VJ heights and body masswere used in the Sayers Peak Power Equation to calculate PAPw. Power-to-weight (P:W) ratios werethen calculated by dividing PAPw by the officer’s body mass. Paired samples t-tests were used toinvestigate differences in performance with alpha levels set at 0.05 a priori.RESULTSWhile VJ height significantly (p < 0.001) decreased with load (unloaded height =49.49 ± 8.46 cm:loaded height =43.62 ± 7.68 cm), PAPw increased significantly (p < 0.01) (unloaded = 4963.02 ±879.17: loaded = 5039.83 ± 913.92 watts). A Pearson’s correlation showed a significant (p < 0.01)low-moderate (r = 0.387) relationship between absolute load (9.57 ± .94 kg) and change in PAPw,and a significant (p < 0.01) strong (r = 0.794) correlation between relative load and changes in P:W.CONCLUSIONSThis study supports previous research that suggests that occupational load carriage has a negativeimpact on VJ performance in police officers and may be detrimental to job performance. Targetedtraining programs aimed at increasing lower limb power may mitigate these negative effects.
Original languageEnglish
Pages37
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2018
Event3rd International Conference on Physical Employments Standards - Portsmouth UK, United Kingdom
Duration: 17 Jul 201819 Jul 2018
Conference number: 3rd
http://www2.port.ac.uk/the-third-international-conference-on-physical-employment-standards/

Conference

Conference3rd International Conference on Physical Employments Standards
Abbreviated titlePES 2018
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityPortsmouth UK
Period17/07/1819/07/18
Internet address

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Police
Lower Extremity
Clothing
Body Height
Extremities
Weights and Measures
Wounds and Injuries
Research
Population

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Wiley, A., Joseph, A., Orr, R. M., Schram, B., Kornhauser, C., Holmes, R., & Dawes, J. (2018). The impact of external loads carried by police officers on vertical jump performance. 37. Abstract from 3rd International Conference on Physical Employments Standards, Portsmouth UK, United Kingdom.
Wiley, Amy ; Joseph, Aaron ; Orr, Rob Marc ; Schram, Ben ; Kornhauser, Charles ; Holmes, Ryan ; Dawes, James. / The impact of external loads carried by police officers on vertical jump performance. Abstract from 3rd International Conference on Physical Employments Standards, Portsmouth UK, United Kingdom.1 p.
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title = "The impact of external loads carried by police officers on vertical jump performance",
abstract = "INTRODUCTIONPolice officers require a high level of lower limb power to complete occupational tasks. Deficits inlower limb power have been linked to an increased risk of injury in this population. With the additionof around 10 kg of external loads that police officers are required to carry, it is thought that theability to perform explosive, power-based movements may be impacted. The purpose of this studywas to examine the impact that external loads carried by police officers had on their vertical jump(VJ) height and peak anaerobic power output (PAPw).METHODSRetrospective data of 47 (mean age = 38.79 ± 7.97 years) police officers from a US Law EnforcementAgency (LEA) were used for analysis. Officers completed a VJ dressed either in gym clothing or in fullduty attire and occupational loads (9.57 ± 0.94 kg, range 7.08 – 12.02 kg). VJ heights and body masswere used in the Sayers Peak Power Equation to calculate PAPw. Power-to-weight (P:W) ratios werethen calculated by dividing PAPw by the officer’s body mass. Paired samples t-tests were used toinvestigate differences in performance with alpha levels set at 0.05 a priori.RESULTSWhile VJ height significantly (p < 0.001) decreased with load (unloaded height =49.49 ± 8.46 cm:loaded height =43.62 ± 7.68 cm), PAPw increased significantly (p < 0.01) (unloaded = 4963.02 ±879.17: loaded = 5039.83 ± 913.92 watts). A Pearson’s correlation showed a significant (p < 0.01)low-moderate (r = 0.387) relationship between absolute load (9.57 ± .94 kg) and change in PAPw,and a significant (p < 0.01) strong (r = 0.794) correlation between relative load and changes in P:W.CONCLUSIONSThis study supports previous research that suggests that occupational load carriage has a negativeimpact on VJ performance in police officers and may be detrimental to job performance. Targetedtraining programs aimed at increasing lower limb power may mitigate these negative effects.",
author = "Amy Wiley and Aaron Joseph and Orr, {Rob Marc} and Ben Schram and Charles Kornhauser and Ryan Holmes and James Dawes",
year = "2018",
language = "English",
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note = "3rd International Conference on Physical Employments Standards, PES 2018 ; Conference date: 17-07-2018 Through 19-07-2018",
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Wiley, A, Joseph, A, Orr, RM, Schram, B, Kornhauser, C, Holmes, R & Dawes, J 2018, 'The impact of external loads carried by police officers on vertical jump performance' 3rd International Conference on Physical Employments Standards, Portsmouth UK, United Kingdom, 17/07/18 - 19/07/18, pp. 37.

The impact of external loads carried by police officers on vertical jump performance. / Wiley, Amy; Joseph, Aaron; Orr, Rob Marc; Schram, Ben; Kornhauser, Charles; Holmes, Ryan; Dawes, James.

2018. 37 Abstract from 3rd International Conference on Physical Employments Standards, Portsmouth UK, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - The impact of external loads carried by police officers on vertical jump performance

AU - Wiley, Amy

AU - Joseph, Aaron

AU - Orr, Rob Marc

AU - Schram, Ben

AU - Kornhauser, Charles

AU - Holmes, Ryan

AU - Dawes, James

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - INTRODUCTIONPolice officers require a high level of lower limb power to complete occupational tasks. Deficits inlower limb power have been linked to an increased risk of injury in this population. With the additionof around 10 kg of external loads that police officers are required to carry, it is thought that theability to perform explosive, power-based movements may be impacted. The purpose of this studywas to examine the impact that external loads carried by police officers had on their vertical jump(VJ) height and peak anaerobic power output (PAPw).METHODSRetrospective data of 47 (mean age = 38.79 ± 7.97 years) police officers from a US Law EnforcementAgency (LEA) were used for analysis. Officers completed a VJ dressed either in gym clothing or in fullduty attire and occupational loads (9.57 ± 0.94 kg, range 7.08 – 12.02 kg). VJ heights and body masswere used in the Sayers Peak Power Equation to calculate PAPw. Power-to-weight (P:W) ratios werethen calculated by dividing PAPw by the officer’s body mass. Paired samples t-tests were used toinvestigate differences in performance with alpha levels set at 0.05 a priori.RESULTSWhile VJ height significantly (p < 0.001) decreased with load (unloaded height =49.49 ± 8.46 cm:loaded height =43.62 ± 7.68 cm), PAPw increased significantly (p < 0.01) (unloaded = 4963.02 ±879.17: loaded = 5039.83 ± 913.92 watts). A Pearson’s correlation showed a significant (p < 0.01)low-moderate (r = 0.387) relationship between absolute load (9.57 ± .94 kg) and change in PAPw,and a significant (p < 0.01) strong (r = 0.794) correlation between relative load and changes in P:W.CONCLUSIONSThis study supports previous research that suggests that occupational load carriage has a negativeimpact on VJ performance in police officers and may be detrimental to job performance. Targetedtraining programs aimed at increasing lower limb power may mitigate these negative effects.

AB - INTRODUCTIONPolice officers require a high level of lower limb power to complete occupational tasks. Deficits inlower limb power have been linked to an increased risk of injury in this population. With the additionof around 10 kg of external loads that police officers are required to carry, it is thought that theability to perform explosive, power-based movements may be impacted. The purpose of this studywas to examine the impact that external loads carried by police officers had on their vertical jump(VJ) height and peak anaerobic power output (PAPw).METHODSRetrospective data of 47 (mean age = 38.79 ± 7.97 years) police officers from a US Law EnforcementAgency (LEA) were used for analysis. Officers completed a VJ dressed either in gym clothing or in fullduty attire and occupational loads (9.57 ± 0.94 kg, range 7.08 – 12.02 kg). VJ heights and body masswere used in the Sayers Peak Power Equation to calculate PAPw. Power-to-weight (P:W) ratios werethen calculated by dividing PAPw by the officer’s body mass. Paired samples t-tests were used toinvestigate differences in performance with alpha levels set at 0.05 a priori.RESULTSWhile VJ height significantly (p < 0.001) decreased with load (unloaded height =49.49 ± 8.46 cm:loaded height =43.62 ± 7.68 cm), PAPw increased significantly (p < 0.01) (unloaded = 4963.02 ±879.17: loaded = 5039.83 ± 913.92 watts). A Pearson’s correlation showed a significant (p < 0.01)low-moderate (r = 0.387) relationship between absolute load (9.57 ± .94 kg) and change in PAPw,and a significant (p < 0.01) strong (r = 0.794) correlation between relative load and changes in P:W.CONCLUSIONSThis study supports previous research that suggests that occupational load carriage has a negativeimpact on VJ performance in police officers and may be detrimental to job performance. Targetedtraining programs aimed at increasing lower limb power may mitigate these negative effects.

UR - http://www2.port.ac.uk/media/contacts-and-departments/sports-and-exercise-science/Book-of-Abstracts_PES2018.pdf

M3 - Abstract

SP - 37

ER -

Wiley A, Joseph A, Orr RM, Schram B, Kornhauser C, Holmes R et al. The impact of external loads carried by police officers on vertical jump performance. 2018. Abstract from 3rd International Conference on Physical Employments Standards, Portsmouth UK, United Kingdom.