The heart rates and movement speed of Specialist Tactical Police during a multistorey active shooter training scenario

Jeremy Robinson, Mihajlo Micovic, Ben Schram, Alexander Leroux, Rob Marc Orr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
29 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Specialist police tactical groups (PTGs) are involved in situations that extend beyond the capability of general duties police and can include responding to active shooter incidents. Due to the nature of their tasks, these officers typically carry and wear additional equipment which can impart an increased physical cost, for which the officers must be prepared. The aim of this study was to examine the heart rate responses and movement speeds of specialist PTG officers during a multistorey active shooter scenario. Eight PTG officers completed an active shooter scenario within a multistorey office building district whereby they were required to carry and wear their usual occupational personal protection equipment (average load = 16.25 ± 1.39 kg) while clearing high-risk environments and locating an active threat. Heart rates (HR) and movement speeds were all recorded via HR and global positioning system monitors. Average PTG officer HR over the duration (19.14 ± 0.70 minutes) was 165 ± 6.93 bpm (89 ± 4% age predicted heart rate maximum (APHRmax)) with 50% of the scenario performed at intensities between 90-100% APHRmax. Around 75% of the scenario had the officers moving at speeds of between 3-6.99 kilometers per hour (km/h), although speeds of 7-10.99 km/h were not uncommon. Understanding the responses of specialist officers during a multistory active shooter scenario may help in designing specific strength and conditioning programs to meet this potential scenario demand.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)281-292
JournalInternational Journal of Exercise Science
Volume16
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2023

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