The Functional Movement Screen as a predictor of police recruit occupational task performance

Claire Bock, Michael Stierli, Benjamin Hinton, Robin Orr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)
91 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

AIM: The aim of this study was to determine whether poor movement patterns impact on police recruit task performance.

METHODS: Fifty-three volunteers were randomly selected from a pool of 173 police recruits attending basic recruit training. Relationships between movement performance, as measured by the Functional Movement Screen, and four occupational tasks were investigated.

RESULTS: Eleven percent failed the marksmanship and baton strike assessments, 21% failed defensive tactics and 36% failed the tactical options assessment. Mean Functional Movement Screen score was 13.96 points (±1.99 points). Only the tactical options assessment approached a significant difference (p = 0.077) between pass/fail recruits. When Functional Movement Screen scores when graded as pass (14+) or fail (<14) again only the tactical options assessment approached significance (p = 0.057).

CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that a relationship between an officer's movement patterns and occupational performance, most notably choice of tactical options, may exist.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)310-315
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2016

Fingerprint

Task Performance and Analysis
Police
Volunteers

Cite this

@article{2b5963a9a82a4f4a943c8aca78ccf92d,
title = "The Functional Movement Screen as a predictor of police recruit occupational task performance",
abstract = "AIM: The aim of this study was to determine whether poor movement patterns impact on police recruit task performance.METHODS: Fifty-three volunteers were randomly selected from a pool of 173 police recruits attending basic recruit training. Relationships between movement performance, as measured by the Functional Movement Screen, and four occupational tasks were investigated.RESULTS: Eleven percent failed the marksmanship and baton strike assessments, 21{\%} failed defensive tactics and 36{\%} failed the tactical options assessment. Mean Functional Movement Screen score was 13.96 points (±1.99 points). Only the tactical options assessment approached a significant difference (p = 0.077) between pass/fail recruits. When Functional Movement Screen scores when graded as pass (14+) or fail (<14) again only the tactical options assessment approached significance (p = 0.057).CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that a relationship between an officer's movement patterns and occupational performance, most notably choice of tactical options, may exist.",
author = "Claire Bock and Michael Stierli and Benjamin Hinton and Robin Orr",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2016",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1016/j.jbmt.2015.11.006",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "310--315",
journal = "Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies",
issn = "1360-8592",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",
number = "2",

}

The Functional Movement Screen as a predictor of police recruit occupational task performance. / Bock, Claire; Stierli, Michael; Hinton, Benjamin; Orr, Robin.

In: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Vol. 20, No. 2, 04.2016, p. 310-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Functional Movement Screen as a predictor of police recruit occupational task performance

AU - Bock, Claire

AU - Stierli, Michael

AU - Hinton, Benjamin

AU - Orr, Robin

N1 - Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2016/4

Y1 - 2016/4

N2 - AIM: The aim of this study was to determine whether poor movement patterns impact on police recruit task performance.METHODS: Fifty-three volunteers were randomly selected from a pool of 173 police recruits attending basic recruit training. Relationships between movement performance, as measured by the Functional Movement Screen, and four occupational tasks were investigated.RESULTS: Eleven percent failed the marksmanship and baton strike assessments, 21% failed defensive tactics and 36% failed the tactical options assessment. Mean Functional Movement Screen score was 13.96 points (±1.99 points). Only the tactical options assessment approached a significant difference (p = 0.077) between pass/fail recruits. When Functional Movement Screen scores when graded as pass (14+) or fail (<14) again only the tactical options assessment approached significance (p = 0.057).CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that a relationship between an officer's movement patterns and occupational performance, most notably choice of tactical options, may exist.

AB - AIM: The aim of this study was to determine whether poor movement patterns impact on police recruit task performance.METHODS: Fifty-three volunteers were randomly selected from a pool of 173 police recruits attending basic recruit training. Relationships between movement performance, as measured by the Functional Movement Screen, and four occupational tasks were investigated.RESULTS: Eleven percent failed the marksmanship and baton strike assessments, 21% failed defensive tactics and 36% failed the tactical options assessment. Mean Functional Movement Screen score was 13.96 points (±1.99 points). Only the tactical options assessment approached a significant difference (p = 0.077) between pass/fail recruits. When Functional Movement Screen scores when graded as pass (14+) or fail (<14) again only the tactical options assessment approached significance (p = 0.057).CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that a relationship between an officer's movement patterns and occupational performance, most notably choice of tactical options, may exist.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84949638100&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jbmt.2015.11.006

DO - 10.1016/j.jbmt.2015.11.006

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 310

EP - 315

JO - Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies

JF - Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies

SN - 1360-8592

IS - 2

ER -