The feasibility and acceptability of questionnaires and accelerometry for measuring physical activity and sedentary behaviour in adults with mental illness

Justin J. Chapman*, Sarah J. Fraser, Wendy J. Brown, Nicola W. Burton

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Adults with mental illness may have difficulties with data collection methods such as questionnaires and accelerometry.

Aims: To assess the utility of questionnaires and accelerometry for assessing physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviour (SB) in non-institutionalised adults with mental illness.

Methods: Participants were recruited from outpatient clinics and community organisations. Participants completed PA and SB questionnaires, wore accelerometers for 7 d, and rated the ease/difficulty of completing study components. Recruitment numbers, adherence, and ease/difficulty ratings were examined. Ease/difficulty ratings were compared between study components, and between participants by distress level.

Results: One hundred forty-two participants completed the questionnaires; they found it easier to report PA than reclining time (p = 0.017), and reclining time than sitting time (p < 0.001). Participants with high distress found it more difficult to report sitting time and PA than participants with low distress (p < 0.017). Ninety-nine participants (70%) completed the accelerometry; the majority (88%) met the minimum wear-time criteria. They found it easier to wear the monitor during the day than while sleeping (p < 0.001), and easier to complete accelerometry than questionnaires (p < 0.001).

Conclusions: Accelerometry was more feasible for assessing SB than questionnaires. Questionnaires were feasible for assessing PA, but less acceptable for people experiencing high distress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-304
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Mental Health
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Sep 2015
Externally publishedYes

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