The Environment as "Client": Overcoming Anthropocentric Barriers in Law and Social Work

Kathrine Galloway, Peter Jones

Research output: Contribution to conferencePresentationResearch

Abstract

As disciplines whose foundations are firmly rooted in the paradigms of The Enlightenment and Modernity, law and social work have traditionally operated from anthropocentric positions. Each has attempted to grapple with the challenge of environmental sustainability, but their anthropocentric orientation limits the degree to which they can effectively respond. In this paper, the authors argue that a more fundamentally transformative approach is required, challenging the notion of ‘the client’ that is common to both professions.

Traditionally, the ‘client’ in both law and social work has been a person, group of people, or an entity comprised of human agents. As professions concerned primarily with issues of justice, equity and rights, a human-centred focus has been adequate in the past, but falls far short of what will be required if we are to move towards a sustainable future. If, however, we flip this traditional framing on its head, we can begin to explore the notion of the environment itself as the ‘client’ of professional legal and social work services. Conceptualising the environment in this manner provides ethical and professional legitimacy for action and activism around environmental issues. This paper explores the implications of ‘environment as client’ in law and social work.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2016
EventTwelfth International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic & Social Sustainability - Portland State University, Portland, United States
Duration: 21 Jan 201623 Jan 2016
https://onsustainability.com/about/history/2016-conference

Conference

ConferenceTwelfth International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic & Social Sustainability
CountryUnited States
CityPortland
Period21/01/1623/01/16
Internet address

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social work
Law
profession
modernity
legitimacy
equity
justice
sustainability
paradigm
human being
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Cite this

Galloway, K., & Jones, P. (2016). The Environment as "Client": Overcoming Anthropocentric Barriers in Law and Social Work. Twelfth International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic & Social Sustainability, Portland, United States.
Galloway, Kathrine ; Jones, Peter. / The Environment as "Client": Overcoming Anthropocentric Barriers in Law and Social Work. Twelfth International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic & Social Sustainability, Portland, United States.
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Galloway, K & Jones, P 2016, 'The Environment as "Client": Overcoming Anthropocentric Barriers in Law and Social Work' Twelfth International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic & Social Sustainability, Portland, United States, 21/01/16 - 23/01/16, .

The Environment as "Client": Overcoming Anthropocentric Barriers in Law and Social Work. / Galloway, Kathrine; Jones, Peter.

2016. Twelfth International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic & Social Sustainability, Portland, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePresentationResearch

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T1 - The Environment as "Client": Overcoming Anthropocentric Barriers in Law and Social Work

AU - Galloway, Kathrine

AU - Jones, Peter

PY - 2016

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M3 - Presentation

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Galloway K, Jones P. The Environment as "Client": Overcoming Anthropocentric Barriers in Law and Social Work. 2016. Twelfth International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic & Social Sustainability, Portland, United States.