The effects of tai chi in centrally obese adults with depression symptoms

Xin Liu*, Luis Vitetta, Karam Kostner, David Crompton, Gail Williams, Wendy J. Brown, Alan Lopez, Charlie C. Xue, Tian P. Oei, Gerard Byrne, Jennifer H. Martin, Harvey Whiteford

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

This study examined the effects of Tai Chi, a low-impact mind-body movement therapy, on severity of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms in centrally obese people with elevated depression symptoms. In total, 213 participants were randomized to a 24-week Tai Chi intervention program or a wait-list control group. Assessments were conducted at baseline and 12 and 24 weeks. Outcomes were severity of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, leg strength, central obesity, and other measures of metabolic symptom. There were statistically significant between-group differences in favor of the Tai Chi group in depression (mean difference = -5.6 units, P < 0.001), anxiety (-2.3 units, P < 0.01), and stress (-3.6 units, P < 0.001) symptom scores and leg strength (1.1 units, P < 0.001) at 12 weeks. These changes were further improved or maintained in the Tai Chi group relative to the control group during the second 12 weeks of follow-up. Tai Chi appears to be beneficial for reducing severity of depression, anxiety, and stress and leg strength in centrally obese people with depression symptoms. More studies with longer follow-up are needed to confirm the findings. This trial is registered with ACTRN12613000010796.

Original languageEnglish
Article number879712
JournalEvidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Jan 2015
Externally publishedYes

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