The effect of socioeconomic disadvantage on prescription of guideline-recommended medications for patients with acute coronary syndrome: systematic review and meta-analysis

Karice K Hyun, David Brieger, Mark Woodward, Sarah Richtering, Julie Redfern

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: There are varying data on whether socioeconomic status (SES) affects the treatment in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Our aim was to obtain a reliable estimate of the effect of SES on discharge prescription of medications following an ACS through systematic review and meta-analysis.

METHODS: Medline, EMBASE and Global Health were searched systematically on 6th April 2016. Studies were eligible if the participants had ACS and reported the rate/odds of guideline-recommended ACS medications prescription (aspirin, antiplatelet, beta blocker, angiotensin co-enzyme inhibitors (ACEi)/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) and statin) at discharge stratified by SES. A meta-analysis was performed to pool the estimates, comparing the prescription ratio (PR) between the lowest and the highest SES groups.

RESULTS: Of 252 articles found from the search, seven met the eligibility criteria and it included 41,462 (20,986 from the lowest SES group) patients. We found that the individual/neighbourhood level SES did not affect the prescription of aspirin (PR (95% CI): 0.97 (0.91, 1.03)), but for beta blocker and statin, the lowest SES group were disadvantaged (0.84 (0.73, 0.94), 0.80 (0.62, 0.98), respectively). In contrast, ACEi were prescribed more often to the lowest individual/neighbourhood level SES group than the highest (1.13 (1.05, 1.22)). Although the risk of bias was low, there was considerable heterogeneity between the studies.

CONCLUSIONS: Despite the recommendations to close the treatment gap, the rate of prescription of guideline-recommended medications in managing ACS is significantly different between patients with the lowest and the highest groups. A solution is needed to provide equitable care across the SES groups.

PROSPERO REGISTRY: Systematic review registration no.: CRD42016048503. Registered 28 September 2016.

Original languageEnglish
Article number162
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal for Equity in Health
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Aug 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The effect of socioeconomic disadvantage on prescription of guideline-recommended medications for patients with acute coronary syndrome: systematic review and meta-analysis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this