The effect of rapport in forensic interviewing

Roger Collins, Robyn Lincoln, Mark G. Frank

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

86 Citations (Scopus)
98 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The psychological literature suggests that establishing rapport between interviewer and subject – whether in clinical, experimental or forensic settings – is likely to enhance the quality of the interaction. Yet there are surprisingly few studies that test this assumption. This article reports a study of the effect of rapport on eyewitness recall of a dramatic videotaped event by creating three interviewer-attitude conditions – “rapport”, “neutral” and “abrupt”. Participants were randomly assigned to the three conditions, and recall was elicited by two methods – free narrative and a semi-structured questionnaire. The results indicate participants in the rapport interview recalled more correct information, and the same amount of incorrect information as participants in the other two conditions. However, prompting via the semi-structured questionnaire yielded additional correct as well as incorrect information for the neutral and abrupt conditions. The results are discussed for their relevance to interviews conducted in forensic settings, and to highlight the need for more specific and improved interview training for police and other justice personnel. © 2002 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-78
Number of pages10
JournalPsychiatry, Psychology and Law
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Interviews
interview
questionnaire
Social Justice
Police
personnel
police
justice
Psychology
narrative
event
interaction
Group
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Collins, Roger ; Lincoln, Robyn ; Frank, Mark G. / The effect of rapport in forensic interviewing. In: Psychiatry, Psychology and Law. 2002 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 69-78.
@article{5dfaec8359494a5dab26d495f85a674a,
title = "The effect of rapport in forensic interviewing",
abstract = "The psychological literature suggests that establishing rapport between interviewer and subject – whether in clinical, experimental or forensic settings – is likely to enhance the quality of the interaction. Yet there are surprisingly few studies that test this assumption. This article reports a study of the effect of rapport on eyewitness recall of a dramatic videotaped event by creating three interviewer-attitude conditions – “rapport”, “neutral” and “abrupt”. Participants were randomly assigned to the three conditions, and recall was elicited by two methods – free narrative and a semi-structured questionnaire. The results indicate participants in the rapport interview recalled more correct information, and the same amount of incorrect information as participants in the other two conditions. However, prompting via the semi-structured questionnaire yielded additional correct as well as incorrect information for the neutral and abrupt conditions. The results are discussed for their relevance to interviews conducted in forensic settings, and to highlight the need for more specific and improved interview training for police and other justice personnel. {\circledC} 2002 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.",
author = "Roger Collins and Robyn Lincoln and Frank, {Mark G.}",
year = "2002",
doi = "10.1375/pplt.2002.9.1.69",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "69--78",
journal = "Psychiatry, Psychology and Law",
issn = "1321-8719",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

The effect of rapport in forensic interviewing. / Collins, Roger; Lincoln, Robyn; Frank, Mark G.

In: Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, Vol. 9, No. 1, 2002, p. 69-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of rapport in forensic interviewing

AU - Collins, Roger

AU - Lincoln, Robyn

AU - Frank, Mark G.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - The psychological literature suggests that establishing rapport between interviewer and subject – whether in clinical, experimental or forensic settings – is likely to enhance the quality of the interaction. Yet there are surprisingly few studies that test this assumption. This article reports a study of the effect of rapport on eyewitness recall of a dramatic videotaped event by creating three interviewer-attitude conditions – “rapport”, “neutral” and “abrupt”. Participants were randomly assigned to the three conditions, and recall was elicited by two methods – free narrative and a semi-structured questionnaire. The results indicate participants in the rapport interview recalled more correct information, and the same amount of incorrect information as participants in the other two conditions. However, prompting via the semi-structured questionnaire yielded additional correct as well as incorrect information for the neutral and abrupt conditions. The results are discussed for their relevance to interviews conducted in forensic settings, and to highlight the need for more specific and improved interview training for police and other justice personnel. © 2002 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

AB - The psychological literature suggests that establishing rapport between interviewer and subject – whether in clinical, experimental or forensic settings – is likely to enhance the quality of the interaction. Yet there are surprisingly few studies that test this assumption. This article reports a study of the effect of rapport on eyewitness recall of a dramatic videotaped event by creating three interviewer-attitude conditions – “rapport”, “neutral” and “abrupt”. Participants were randomly assigned to the three conditions, and recall was elicited by two methods – free narrative and a semi-structured questionnaire. The results indicate participants in the rapport interview recalled more correct information, and the same amount of incorrect information as participants in the other two conditions. However, prompting via the semi-structured questionnaire yielded additional correct as well as incorrect information for the neutral and abrupt conditions. The results are discussed for their relevance to interviews conducted in forensic settings, and to highlight the need for more specific and improved interview training for police and other justice personnel. © 2002 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85007864077&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1375/pplt.2002.9.1.69

DO - 10.1375/pplt.2002.9.1.69

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 69

EP - 78

JO - Psychiatry, Psychology and Law

JF - Psychiatry, Psychology and Law

SN - 1321-8719

IS - 1

ER -