The effect of higher than recommended protein feedings post-exercise on recovery following downhill running in masters triathletes

Thomas Doering, Peter R Reaburn, Nattai R. Borges, Gregory R Cox, David G Jenkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Following exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), masters athletes take longer to recover than younger athletes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of higher than recommended postexercise protein feedings on the recovery of knee extensor peak isometric torque (PIT), perceptions of recovery, and cycling time trial (TT) performance following EIMD in masters triathletes. Eight masters triathletes (52 ?} 2 y, V?O2max, 51.8 ?} 4.2 ml•kg-1•min-1) completed two trials separated by seven days in a randomized, doubleblind, crossover study. Trials consisted of morning PIT testing and a 30-min downhill run followed by an eight-hour recovery. During recovery, a moderate (MPI; 0.3 g•kg-1•bolus-1) or high (0.6 g•kg-1•bolus-1) protein intake (HPI) was consumed in three bolus feedings at two hour intervals commencing immediately postexercise. PIT testing and a 7 kJ•kg-1 cycling TT were completed postintervention. Perceptions of recovery were assessed pre-And postexercise. The HPI did not significantly improve recovery compared with MPI (p > .05). However, comparison of within-Treatment change shows the HPI provided a moderate beneficial effect (d = 0.66), attenuating the loss of afternoon PIT (-3.6%, d = 0.09) compared with the MPI (-8.6%, d = 0.24). The HPI provided a large beneficial effect (d = 0.83), reducing perceived fatigue over the eight-hour recovery (d = 1.25) compared with the MPI (d = 0.22). Despite these effects, cycling performance was unchanged (HPI = 2395 ?} 297 s vs. MPI = 2369 ?} 278 s; d = 0.09). In conclusion, doubling the recommended postexercise protein intake did not significantly improve recovery in masters athletes; however, HPI provided moderate to large beneficial effects on recovery that may be meaningful following EIMD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)76-82
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
Volume27
Issue number1
Early online date24 Aug 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2017
Externally publishedYes

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torque
Torque
Running
athletes
exercise
Athletes
Exercise
protein intake
Muscles
muscles
Proteins
proteins
knees
Cross-Over Studies
Fatigue
Knee
testing
Therapeutics

Cite this

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title = "The effect of higher than recommended protein feedings post-exercise on recovery following downhill running in masters triathletes",
abstract = "Following exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), masters athletes take longer to recover than younger athletes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of higher than recommended postexercise protein feedings on the recovery of knee extensor peak isometric torque (PIT), perceptions of recovery, and cycling time trial (TT) performance following EIMD in masters triathletes. Eight masters triathletes (52 ?} 2 y, V?O2max, 51.8 ?} 4.2 ml•kg-1•min-1) completed two trials separated by seven days in a randomized, doubleblind, crossover study. Trials consisted of morning PIT testing and a 30-min downhill run followed by an eight-hour recovery. During recovery, a moderate (MPI; 0.3 g•kg-1•bolus-1) or high (0.6 g•kg-1•bolus-1) protein intake (HPI) was consumed in three bolus feedings at two hour intervals commencing immediately postexercise. PIT testing and a 7 kJ•kg-1 cycling TT were completed postintervention. Perceptions of recovery were assessed pre-And postexercise. The HPI did not significantly improve recovery compared with MPI (p > .05). However, comparison of within-Treatment change shows the HPI provided a moderate beneficial effect (d = 0.66), attenuating the loss of afternoon PIT (-3.6{\%}, d = 0.09) compared with the MPI (-8.6{\%}, d = 0.24). The HPI provided a large beneficial effect (d = 0.83), reducing perceived fatigue over the eight-hour recovery (d = 1.25) compared with the MPI (d = 0.22). Despite these effects, cycling performance was unchanged (HPI = 2395 ?} 297 s vs. MPI = 2369 ?} 278 s; d = 0.09). In conclusion, doubling the recommended postexercise protein intake did not significantly improve recovery in masters athletes; however, HPI provided moderate to large beneficial effects on recovery that may be meaningful following EIMD.",
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The effect of higher than recommended protein feedings post-exercise on recovery following downhill running in masters triathletes. / Doering, Thomas; Reaburn, Peter R; Borges, Nattai R.; Cox, Gregory R; Jenkins, David G.

In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.02.2017, p. 76-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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