The effect of biological movement variability on the performance of the golf swing in high- and low-handicapped players

Elizabeth J. Bradshaw, Justin W.L. Keogh, Patria A. Hume, Peter S. Maulder, Jacques Nortje, Michel Marnewick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the role of neuromotor noise on golf swing performance in high- and low-handicap players. Selected two-dimensional kinematic measures of 20 male golfers (n = 10 per high- or low-handicap group) performing 10 golf swings with a 5-iron club was obtained through video analysis. Neuromotor noise was calculated by deducting the standard error of the measurement from the coefficient of variation obtained from intra-individual analysis. Statistical methods included linear regression analysis and one-way analysis of variance using SPSS. Absolute invariance in the key technical positions (e.g., at the top of the backswing) of the golf swing appears to be a more favorable technique for skilled performance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)185-196
Number of pages12
JournalResearch Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Volume80
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Golf
Disabled Persons
Noise
Biomechanical Phenomena
Linear Models
Analysis of Variance
Iron
Regression Analysis

Cite this

Bradshaw, Elizabeth J. ; Keogh, Justin W.L. ; Hume, Patria A. ; Maulder, Peter S. ; Nortje, Jacques ; Marnewick, Michel. / The effect of biological movement variability on the performance of the golf swing in high- and low-handicapped players. In: Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport. 2009 ; Vol. 80, No. 2. pp. 185-196.
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The effect of biological movement variability on the performance of the golf swing in high- and low-handicapped players. / Bradshaw, Elizabeth J.; Keogh, Justin W.L.; Hume, Patria A.; Maulder, Peter S.; Nortje, Jacques; Marnewick, Michel.

In: Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, Vol. 80, No. 2, 2009, p. 185-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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