The effect of age on post-exercise recovery following high-intensity interval training: A comprehensive analysis of recovery following high intensity interval cycling

Nattai R. Borges, Peter R J Reaburn, Matthew Driller, Thomas M Doering

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearch

Abstract

Introduction Data about age-related differences in recovery following high intensity interval training (HIIT) in trained masters and young subjects is lacking. Therefore, this study examined the effect of age on acute (0-1 h) and chronic (1-48 h) recovery following HIIT. Methods Masters (n=9, age=55.6±5.0 yr) and young (n=8, age=25.9±3.0 yr) cyclists underwent a 6x30 sec HIIT cycle protocol at 175% of peak power output with 4.5 min rest between efforts. During acute recovery, 40 min of supine rest occurred where heart rate (HR), oxygen consumption (V̇ O2) and lactate values were collected. Chronic recovery was monitored via performance tests (10 sec cycle sprint, countermovement jump, maximal voluntary contraction of knee extensors, and 30 min time trial), perceptual recovery scales (recovery, fatigue, motivation, muscle soreness) and creatine kinase (CK) at 1, 24 and 48 h post HIIT. Results No significant between group differences were observed for HR recovery, relative or absolute V̇ O2, or blood lactate values (P>0.05). Analysis of effect size (ES) showed moderate differences for HR recovery (d±90%CI=0.81±0.80) and final recovery lactate (d=0.70±0.81) taken at 20 min suggesting delayed acute recovery in masters cyclists. No significant group-time interactions were observed for performance recovery and CK (P>0.05). A significant interaction effect was found for perceptual fatigue (P=0.01) and ES analysis showed that perceptual recovery was delayed with masters cyclists reporting lower motivation (d=0.69±0.77, moderate), greater fatigue (d=0.75±0.93, moderate) and muscle soreness (d =0.61±0.70, moderate) after 48 hours of recovery. Conclusion Despite differences in acute recovery, there were no age-related differences in performance recovery following HIIT. Masters cyclists showed a perceived delay in recovery and fatigue over the 48 hrs post-exercise which could lead negatively influence training adherence.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2018
EventResearch To Practice 2018 - Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre, Brisbane, Australia
Duration: 27 Mar 201829 Mar 2018
http://researchtopractice2018.com.au/

Conference

ConferenceResearch To Practice 2018
Abbreviated titleRTP
CountryAustralia
CityBrisbane
Period27/03/1829/03/18
Internet address

Fingerprint

Fatigue
Myalgia
Motivation
Lactic Acid
MM Form Creatine Kinase
Creatine Kinase
Oxygen Consumption
Knee
High-Intensity Interval Training

Cite this

@conference{c27d6c75b5e74b93b12517ba472c1b39,
title = "The effect of age on post-exercise recovery following high-intensity interval training: A comprehensive analysis of recovery following high intensity interval cycling",
abstract = "Introduction Data about age-related differences in recovery following high intensity interval training (HIIT) in trained masters and young subjects is lacking. Therefore, this study examined the effect of age on acute (0-1 h) and chronic (1-48 h) recovery following HIIT. Methods Masters (n=9, age=55.6±5.0 yr) and young (n=8, age=25.9±3.0 yr) cyclists underwent a 6x30 sec HIIT cycle protocol at 175{\%} of peak power output with 4.5 min rest between efforts. During acute recovery, 40 min of supine rest occurred where heart rate (HR), oxygen consumption (V̇ O2) and lactate values were collected. Chronic recovery was monitored via performance tests (10 sec cycle sprint, countermovement jump, maximal voluntary contraction of knee extensors, and 30 min time trial), perceptual recovery scales (recovery, fatigue, motivation, muscle soreness) and creatine kinase (CK) at 1, 24 and 48 h post HIIT. Results No significant between group differences were observed for HR recovery, relative or absolute V̇ O2, or blood lactate values (P>0.05). Analysis of effect size (ES) showed moderate differences for HR recovery (d±90{\%}CI=0.81±0.80) and final recovery lactate (d=0.70±0.81) taken at 20 min suggesting delayed acute recovery in masters cyclists. No significant group-time interactions were observed for performance recovery and CK (P>0.05). A significant interaction effect was found for perceptual fatigue (P=0.01) and ES analysis showed that perceptual recovery was delayed with masters cyclists reporting lower motivation (d=0.69±0.77, moderate), greater fatigue (d=0.75±0.93, moderate) and muscle soreness (d =0.61±0.70, moderate) after 48 hours of recovery. Conclusion Despite differences in acute recovery, there were no age-related differences in performance recovery following HIIT. Masters cyclists showed a perceived delay in recovery and fatigue over the 48 hrs post-exercise which could lead negatively influence training adherence.",
author = "Borges, {Nattai R.} and Reaburn, {Peter R J} and Matthew Driller and Doering, {Thomas M}",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
language = "English",
note = "Research To Practice 2018, RTP ; Conference date: 27-03-2018 Through 29-03-2018",
url = "http://researchtopractice2018.com.au/",

}

The effect of age on post-exercise recovery following high-intensity interval training: A comprehensive analysis of recovery following high intensity interval cycling. / Borges, Nattai R.; Reaburn, Peter R J; Driller, Matthew; Doering, Thomas M.

2018. Poster session presented at Research To Practice 2018, Brisbane, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearch

TY - CONF

T1 - The effect of age on post-exercise recovery following high-intensity interval training: A comprehensive analysis of recovery following high intensity interval cycling

AU - Borges, Nattai R.

AU - Reaburn, Peter R J

AU - Driller, Matthew

AU - Doering, Thomas M

PY - 2018/3

Y1 - 2018/3

N2 - Introduction Data about age-related differences in recovery following high intensity interval training (HIIT) in trained masters and young subjects is lacking. Therefore, this study examined the effect of age on acute (0-1 h) and chronic (1-48 h) recovery following HIIT. Methods Masters (n=9, age=55.6±5.0 yr) and young (n=8, age=25.9±3.0 yr) cyclists underwent a 6x30 sec HIIT cycle protocol at 175% of peak power output with 4.5 min rest between efforts. During acute recovery, 40 min of supine rest occurred where heart rate (HR), oxygen consumption (V̇ O2) and lactate values were collected. Chronic recovery was monitored via performance tests (10 sec cycle sprint, countermovement jump, maximal voluntary contraction of knee extensors, and 30 min time trial), perceptual recovery scales (recovery, fatigue, motivation, muscle soreness) and creatine kinase (CK) at 1, 24 and 48 h post HIIT. Results No significant between group differences were observed for HR recovery, relative or absolute V̇ O2, or blood lactate values (P>0.05). Analysis of effect size (ES) showed moderate differences for HR recovery (d±90%CI=0.81±0.80) and final recovery lactate (d=0.70±0.81) taken at 20 min suggesting delayed acute recovery in masters cyclists. No significant group-time interactions were observed for performance recovery and CK (P>0.05). A significant interaction effect was found for perceptual fatigue (P=0.01) and ES analysis showed that perceptual recovery was delayed with masters cyclists reporting lower motivation (d=0.69±0.77, moderate), greater fatigue (d=0.75±0.93, moderate) and muscle soreness (d =0.61±0.70, moderate) after 48 hours of recovery. Conclusion Despite differences in acute recovery, there were no age-related differences in performance recovery following HIIT. Masters cyclists showed a perceived delay in recovery and fatigue over the 48 hrs post-exercise which could lead negatively influence training adherence.

AB - Introduction Data about age-related differences in recovery following high intensity interval training (HIIT) in trained masters and young subjects is lacking. Therefore, this study examined the effect of age on acute (0-1 h) and chronic (1-48 h) recovery following HIIT. Methods Masters (n=9, age=55.6±5.0 yr) and young (n=8, age=25.9±3.0 yr) cyclists underwent a 6x30 sec HIIT cycle protocol at 175% of peak power output with 4.5 min rest between efforts. During acute recovery, 40 min of supine rest occurred where heart rate (HR), oxygen consumption (V̇ O2) and lactate values were collected. Chronic recovery was monitored via performance tests (10 sec cycle sprint, countermovement jump, maximal voluntary contraction of knee extensors, and 30 min time trial), perceptual recovery scales (recovery, fatigue, motivation, muscle soreness) and creatine kinase (CK) at 1, 24 and 48 h post HIIT. Results No significant between group differences were observed for HR recovery, relative or absolute V̇ O2, or blood lactate values (P>0.05). Analysis of effect size (ES) showed moderate differences for HR recovery (d±90%CI=0.81±0.80) and final recovery lactate (d=0.70±0.81) taken at 20 min suggesting delayed acute recovery in masters cyclists. No significant group-time interactions were observed for performance recovery and CK (P>0.05). A significant interaction effect was found for perceptual fatigue (P=0.01) and ES analysis showed that perceptual recovery was delayed with masters cyclists reporting lower motivation (d=0.69±0.77, moderate), greater fatigue (d=0.75±0.93, moderate) and muscle soreness (d =0.61±0.70, moderate) after 48 hours of recovery. Conclusion Despite differences in acute recovery, there were no age-related differences in performance recovery following HIIT. Masters cyclists showed a perceived delay in recovery and fatigue over the 48 hrs post-exercise which could lead negatively influence training adherence.

M3 - Poster

ER -